Hall of Fame

The individuals that comprise the Surface Navy Association's Hall of Fame are not the complete list of those worthy of such recognition. They are representatives of all of our heroes, past and present, who have made an exceptionally significant contribution to the Continental Navy, U.S. Surface Navy, U.S. Coast Guard or to Surface Navy Warfare, whether as a member of the armed services or as a civilian.


If you have an individual you would like considered for our Surface Warfare Hall of Fame, please email us at awards@navysna.org, and include name and a short write up similar to the ones found on this site.


 

Age of Sail 1774-1865

President John Adams 2010 Inductee
Nation's First Vice President and Second President whose initial Presidential address stated, "A naval power, next to the militia, is the natural defense of the United States." He worked in Congress to create the Continental Navy. While President, he created the U.S. Navy Department in 1798 and was determined to protect American neutral shipping rights against French ships and privateers by conducting the 1798-1801 Quasi-War against France.

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Commodore William Bainbridge, 1789-1833 2000 Inductee
During the Quasi War with France, commanded Retaliation and Norfolk. At the end of the Quasi War promoted to Captain and commanded George Washington. Although the unfortunate Captain to lose the Philadelphia at Tripoli in the Barbary Wars of 1804, he continued to provide naval service. As Commanding Officer of Constitution sunk the British frigate Java in the War of 1812 in one of the hardest fought surface actions of all time involving two hours at close quarters. After the War, he commanded the Mediterranean Squadron to enforce peace treaties with states of North Africa.

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Commodore Joshua Barney: 1775-1818 1998 Inductee
American naval hero in the Revolutionary War and the War of 1812. Master’s Mate on Hornet during the raid on the Bahamas Islands in 1776, captured at sea and taken prisoner and exchanged four times; as Captain of the 16-gun Hyder Ally, he captured the larger 20-gun brig General Monk in a battle off Cape May. While leading 500 marines in the Battle of Bladensburg to try to prevent the British destruction of Washington, D.C. in 1814, he was wounded and taken prisoner.

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Commodore John Barry, 1775-1803 1998 Inductee
During the Quasi War with France, commanded Retaliation and Norfolk. At the end of the Quasi War promoted to Captain and commanded George Washington. Although the unfortunate Captain to lose the Philadelphia at Tripoli in the Barbary Wars of 1804, he continued to provide naval service. As Commanding Officer of Constitution sunk the British frigate Java in the War of 1812 in one of the hardest fought surface actions of all time involving two hours at close quarters. After the War, he commanded the Mediterranean Squadron to enforce peace treaties with states of North Africa.

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Captain Nicholas Biddle, 1775-1778 2001 Inductee
One of the first four Captains of the Continental Navy and had command of brig Andrea Doria during the Bahamas raid of March 1776, later capturing two British transports with 400 Highland troops. While commanding frigate Randolph, he captured the British ship True Briton and 3 merchantmen in 1777. In 1778 Randolph with 32 guns engaged HMS Yarmoth (64 guns) and had the better of the fight with the wounded Biddle directing the ships maneuvers from a chair when a shot hit Randolph’s magazine causing its total destruction with only one survivor.

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Contraband Robert Blake, 1864 2006 Inductee
No Image An escaped slave and the first black sailor Medal of Honor winner, was serving aboard gunboat Marblehead off Legareville, Stono River on 25 December 1863. During an engagement with the enemy at John’s Island, Blake serviced the forward rifle-gun, resulting in the enemy’s abandonment of position, leaving a caisson and gun behind.

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Master Commandant Johnston Blakely, 1800-1814 2014 Inductee
Blakely, a daring and aggressive Commander and peer of Hull, Lawrence and Porter is promoted to Master Commandant and given command of the newly built sloop of war Wasp during the War of 1812. Blakely who is known for his seamanship and audacious actions, escapes the large British Blockade at Portsmouth and heads for the western approaches of the English Channel. He engages and captures 14 British prizes, stunning the British Admiralty. One of the prizes is the 21 gun sloop HMS Riendeer. A victory described by the British as one of the bloodiest cutlass battles of the war. After repairs and refitting in L’Orient France, Blakely resumes his interdiction of the British shipping lanes defeating and capturing 5 more prizes including the 18 gun Brig HMS Avon. However, three weeks later Blakely takes Wasp of the North Coast of Ireland in pursuit of more engagements and is struck by a severe northern storm. He and his ship are never seen again.

Blakely is posthumously awarded the thanks of Congress, a gold Medal and advanced to the rank of Captain. Three Navy warships have been named in his honor.

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Nathaniel Bowditch, 1802-1862 2010 Inductee
Printed in 1802 the first accurate aid to navigation, The New American Practical Navigator. It was so effective that the U.S. Government purchased rights to the book and all subsequent versions are known simply as Bowditch. It is not only a notable book but is considered one of America's nautical institutions.

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Landsman Wilson Brown, 1864 - 2006 Inductee
No Image Aboard flagship Hartford during the Battle of Mobile Bay on 5 August 1864, he was knocked unconscious into the hold of the ship when an enemy shell burst fatally wounded a man on a ladder above him. Upon regaining consciousness, Brown promptly returned to the passing of shells on the berth deck to the guns, although four of the six men at this station were either killed or wounded by enemy fire. He was one of the first African Americans awarded the Medal of Honor by the U.S. Navy.

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Captain Gustavus Conyngham, 1777-1780 2002 Inductee
Given command of the small 10-gun ship Surprise in 1777 during the Revolutionary War, he raided English waters, intercepting the King's packet and landing a raiding party on the Isle of Guernsey. He shifted to the 14-gun cutter Revenge in 1778 and seized 60 British ships, becoming the champion lone-wolf commerce raider. His prizes financed the American diplomatic service abroad for two years. Finally captured by a larger frigate HMS Galatea, Conyngham eventually tunneled out and escaped from Britain's Old Mill Prison.

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Coxswain John Cooper 2000 Inductee
No Image During the prolonged Battle of Mobile Bay on August 5, 1864, Coxswain Cooper courageously ensured that his gun aboard USS BROOKLYN continuously functioned despite heavy fire from Confederate forts and ships, and was awarded the Medal of Honor. While subsequently attached to the Admiral’s staff in Mobile Bay, Coxswain Cooper earned a second Medal of Honor on April 16, 1865 by entering an exploding ammunition facility and rescuing a wounded sailor from certain death.

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Gunner Asa Curtis, 1812-1858 2008 Inductee
In the War of 1812, joined Constitution and participated in the capture of British frigate Guerriere and Java. Cited in a special letter by the Sailing Master for action with Java when “he descended the Foretop Gallant stay to rebend the Flying Gib Halyards which had been shot away… an act of his greatly tended by keeping headsail on the ship in capturing the enemy." Gunner’s Mate on Independence when Commodore Bainbridge acquired concessions from Algiers on piracy in 1815. Served again in the Mediterranean Squadron on Java in the late 1820s and aboard Delaware in 1830s; with the Pacific Squadron and aboard Mississippi in 1840’s. In 1856 he was assigned to St. Lawrence, flagship of the Brazil Squadron, dying in Rio de Janeiro after an illness. At the time of his death, he was senior Gunner in the Navy.

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Captain Stephen Decatur, Jr., 1798-1820 1998 Inductees
During the Barbary Wars, converted a Tripolitanian boat, called it Intrepid, sailed it from Sicily to Libya, entered the fortified harbor of Tripoli, went alongside and boarded the previously captured American frigate Philadelphia, blew it up at the pier while escaping without a major casualty. During the War of 1812, was Commanding Officer United States, captured the British frigate Macedonian. After the War of 1812 his Mediterranean Squadron extracted a treaty of peace and amity with the Dey of Algiers that guaranteed ship passage without payment of tribute.

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Coxswain Thomas Fitzpatrick, 1864 2004 Inductee
No Image Earned the Medal of Honor as the Gun Captain of No. 1 gun aboard the flagship Hartford during action at Mobile Bay on 5 August 1864. Although struck several times in the face by splinters, and with his gun disabled when a shell burst between two forward 9-inch guns, killing and wounding 15 men, Fitzpatrick , within a few minutes, had the gun in working order with new track, breeching, and side tackle. He evacuated the wounded and his resumption of gunfire inspired all crew members.

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Seaman Daniel Frazier, 1803-1805 1998 Inductee
Served aboard brig Enterprise and was a member of Captain Stephen Decatur’s crew that manned Gunboat #4 in small boat engagements during the North African Barbary Wars. On 3 August 1804 he saved Captain Decatur’s life by shielding him during hand-to-hand combat and took a sword stroke intended for Captain Decatur.

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Captain Issac Hull, 1798-1843 2000 Inductee
As a junior officer aboard Constitution during Quasi War with France led an expedition into Santo Domingo. Commanded Enterprise and Argus against Barbary Pirates, 1803-04. As skipper of Argus, he assisted the U.S. Army in the capture of Derne, Libya in 1805. Took command of Constitution in 1810, and sunk the British frigate Guerrier in the War of 1812 when the British ship’s shot bounced off the vessel to be henceforth called "Old Ironsides." Commanded Pacific Squadron 1823-27, protecting America’s interests during the various Latin American revolutions while operating out of Callao, Peru. Commanded the Mediterranean Squadron 1838-41 and operated against African slavers.

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Joshua Humphreys 2015 Inductee
Humphreys was commissioned in 1794 to design six frigates for the newly formed U.S. Navy. United States was built by Humphreys in Philadelphia, and was the first of the new ships to be launched on 10 May 1797. These vessels were larger and faster than other ships of their class and formed the core of the Navy during the War of 1812, and scored several victories against British ships. His six frigates were: Constitution, President, United States, Chesapeake, Constellation, and Congress. Humphreys' skill is evident by the fact that one of these ships, Constitution (Old Ironsides), is still afloat.

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Captain John Paul Jones, 1775-1783 1998 Inductee
America's greatest naval hero in the American Revolutionary War, commanding PROVIDENCE, ALFRED, and RANGER (receiving the first salute by a foreign man-of-war to the American flag), raiding England and Scotland; aboard BONHOMME RICHARD in battle with the British warship SERAPIS, when asked to surrender, he said, "I have not yet begun to fight!" He later commanded ARIEL and ALLIANCE.

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First Class Fireman John Laverty (aka "Lafferty"), 1864 2005 Inductee
No Image Awarded two Medals of Honor. First award for action while assigned to Wyalusing in the Roanoke River in North Carolina on 25 May 1864. He volunteered to land to attempt to surprise from ashore the rebel ram Abelmarle on the other side of an island. He transferred two torpedoes ashore from his ship and his team took all night to cross the swampy island to reach the enemy ship, but were discovered and had to abort the mission. Second award was aboard Alaska at Callao Bay, Peru, on 14 September 1881 following the rupture of a stop valve chamber, he hauled the fires from under the boiler.

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Captain James Lawrence, 1800-1812 2001 Inductee
Stephen Decatur's second in command in the burning of the Philadelphia in the Barbary Wars. At the start of the War of 1812, commanded sloop Hornet and captured the British brig Peacock. On 1 June 1813 commanded frigate Chesapeake in an engagement with the British ship Shannon, and as he was wounded and lay dying, he left to the U.S. Navy the legacy of his dying words: "Don't Give Up the Ship."

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Commodore Thomas MacDonough, 1800-1825 2000 Inductee
Building a fleet from scratch on Lake Champlain during the War of 1812, he defeated and captured a squadron of British ships at the Battle of Lake Champlain on September 11, 1814, turning back an attempted invasion of the U.S. from Canada. This total victory not only turned aside the invasion, but led to the peace negotiations to end the War. Commanded frigate Guerrier (1818-20), Ohio (1820-24), and the Mediterranean Squadron (1824-25).

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Captain John Manley, 1775-1783 2000 Inductee
Commissioned by Washington to be Captain of the schooner Lee, he captured three British ships in 1775 in Boston harbor, laden with guns, mortars and military supplies desperately needed by Washington. Commissioned in the Continental Navy as the third senior Captain, he commanded Hancock (capturing British frigate Fox). Captured in 1777 and made prisoner in New York until March 1778, he then commanded Marborough, Cumberland and the prize Jason. He was captured again and imprisoned in England for two years, returning in September 1782 to command Hague. He captured the British ship Baille in January 1783 in one of the final naval actions of the Revolutionary War. During eight years of the war, despite over three years as a POW, he commanded ships that singly captured ten prizes and assisted in the seizure of five others.

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Petty Officer Edward "Ned" Myers, 1812-15, 1827-30, 1835-38 2010 Inductee
Between service in Merchant ships, U.S. Navy, and U.S. Revenue Cutter Service from 1805 until 1840, served aboard 72 ships and was 25 years at sea out of sight of land. First USN enlistment in 1812 at start of the war with Great Britain, he volunteered for duty on Lake Ontario to control that lake and to combat British forces along the lake. Assigned to schooners Scourge and served aboard Oneida and Julia after Scourge sank in a squall. Participated in combat action with British ships and in rowing soldiers ashore to engage British. Taken as a Prisoner of War when Julia was captured by the British, resulting in 19 months in afloat and ashore prisons, escaping and being caught twice. Rejoined USN in 1827 and served aboard Delaware in the Mediterranean and aboard Brandywine in the Gulf of Mexico. While in Revenue Cutter Service, served aboard Jackson supporting the USN blockade of South Carolina during the 1832-33 Nullification crisis. Rejoined the USN during the Second Seminole War commencing in 1835, serving aboard Hudson, Constellation and St. Louis as a gun loader off the coast of Florida. Subject of a famous biography by James Fenimore Cooper.

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Commodore Matthew C. Perry, 1809-1855 2000 Inductee
Promoted the concept of steam for warships, and through his influence the U.S. Navy in 1842 launched the first steam-driven warships, the side-wheelers Mississippi and Missouri. Commanded the Navy that supported the Army landing at Vera Cruz and established the blockade of Mexico. Accomplished a major diplomatic achievement in opening Japan to western trade and communications.

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Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry: 1799-1819 1998 Inducteee
After constructing a squadron of ships, Commodore Perry defeated a British squadron at the Battle of Lake Erie, September 10, 1813 near Put-in-Bay. Perry’s victory secured American control of Lake Erie for the remainder of the war and allowed Major General William Henry Harrison’s Army to reclaim American posts on the Ohio and Michigan frontier, opening those territories to American settlement after the war. Flying a flag with the words of the mortally-wounded Captain James Lawrence "Don't Give up the Ship!", he totally defeated the British squadron and reported to General Harrison, "We have met the enemy and they are ours..."

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Captain David Porter, 1795-1830 2002 Inductee
Father of Admiral David Dixon Porter, raised David Glasgow Farragut after Farragut’s mother died, entered Farragut into the U.S. Navy at age 10, and took him to sea with him in ESSEX during War of 1812. On 3 August 1812, he captured first British Navy vessel (Alert) taken by the U.S. Navy in the War of 1812. While British Navy controlled the Atlantic, Porter, on his own initiative, took control of the Pacific Ocean. With no direction and no logistics support, Porter sailed around the Cape and conducted an ocean campaign that completely eliminated the British lucrative shipping and whaling industries, capturing 12 ships. Founded the first American overseas naval base in the Marquesas. He was defeated at Valpariso Chile in March 1814 by a superior British squadron, suffering 89 dead and 66 wounded to the British 5 killed. Enroute to prison in Halifax, Porter and Farragut escaped to New York by commandeering a small boat. Remaining service was as a Commissioner of the Navy Board until he commanded West India Squadron in 1823 when he cracked down on pirates in Foxardo, Puerto Rico with world’s first steamship to go on war duty, Sea Gull. Subsequent diplomatic furor caused him to resign from the Navy.

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Commodore Edward Preble: 1789-1807 1998 Inductee
Commanded Essex, first USN warship into the Indian Ocean. Commanded the squadron of ships in the Mediterranean during the Barbary Wars against North African states providing the first effective counterforce to the Barbary corsairs and instilling a sense of proactive leadership in our Navy's role in national security. Most of the great naval heroes on the War of 1812 served under him during the Barbary Wars and he was their inspirational role model. Captain Stephen Decatur, Jr. 1798-1820 During the Barbary Wars, converted a Tripolitanian boat, called it Intrepid, sailed it from Sicily to Libya, entered the fortified harbor of Tripoli, went alongside and boarded the previously captured American frigate Philadelphia, blew it up at the pier while escaping without a major casualty. During the War of 1812, was Commanding Officer United States, captured the British frigate Macedonian. After the War of 1812 his Mediterranean Squadron extracted a treaty of peace and amity with the Dey of Algiers that guaranteed ship passage without payment of tribute.

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Master Gunner George Sirian, 1827-1873 2007 Inductee
Orphaned at the age of six in 1824 by a massacre during the Greek War for Independence on the Aegean island of Psara he joined the crew of USS Constitution in April 1827. He joined the crew as a “Boy” and became Ordinary Seaman the next year. Serving aboard 20 different ships and seven shore stations – including three tours aboard the USS Constitution where he exhibited unparalleled leadership and inspiration to hundreds of sailors. Because of his inspirational career, the Surface Navy Association has supported the establishment of the Master Gunner George Sirian Meritorious Service Award presented annually to a Chief Petty Officer in the Surface Navy who exhibits the technical expertise, dedication, and leadership characterized by George Sirian.

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Commodore Thomas Truxtun, 1794-1801 1998 Inductee
The nation’s premier sea fighter in the Quasi War with France; he served in the merchant service for eight years before the American Revolution and was a privateersman during the Revolution, commanding Independence, Mars, and St. James operating in British waters. Appointed Captain in the new U.S. Navy in 1794, he superintended the construction of Constellation, and as Commanding Officer, captured L’Insurgente and defeated La Vengeance in the West Indies. He also was commissioning Commanding Officer of President.

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Captain of the Forecastle James Ward, 1864 2005 Inductee
No Image As a Quarter Gunner aboard Lackawanna during the Battle of Mobile Bay on 5 August 1864, he was wounded and ordered below while servicing his gun during the battle against Fort Morgan and rebel gunboats. He refused to go and stayed servicing his gun when the rest of the crew was disabled. Subsequently manned the chains to provide water depth information to the Commanding Officer, and continued to heave the lead despite the dangerous alongside collision with the rebel ram Tennessee.

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Captain Lambert Wickes, 1775-1777 2008 Inductee
No Image In command of the 46-gun Repulse during Revolutionary War, took Benjamin Franklin to France to be the American Ambassador, capturing three merchant ships enroute. Sailed completely around Ireland in the first raid into English waters (January 1777), capturing and destroying fourteen ships in five days. On the return voyage was sunk in a violent Atlantic storm with only one survivor.

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Maintopman John Williams 2001 Inductee
No Image The first U.S. Navy sailor to earn the Medal of Honor was assigned to Pawnee during the Civil War. While conducting an attack on Mathias Point, Virginia, against a Confederate stronghold on June 26, 1861, Maintopman Williams commanded an assault boat and retained command although severely wounded in the thigh by an enemy musket ball. When enemy fire shot away his boat’s flagstaff, Maintopman Williams held the stump of the flagstaff with the American flag in place with one hand, continued to manuever his boat with his other hand, and rallied and inspired his men to a successful attack.

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Surface Navy in Transition 1865-1915

Ordinary Seaman John Andrews, 1871- 2014 Inductee
No Image Andrews served aboard the Benicia, which was one of five warships deployed during the Korean Expedition of 1871. The purpose of the expedition was to support diplomatic relations and to investigate circumstances surrounding the loss of the merchant ship, General Sherman, who was burned and the crew massacred. On June 1, 1871 Korean shore batteries attacked two American warships. With no apology for the attack, an expedition was then launched against the Korean forts with over 500 Sailors and 100 Marines. The crew landed and captured several forts, killing over 200 Korean troops with a loss of only three American lives. Under heavy fire while engaged in combat with Korean fortifications, Andrews stood on Benicia’s gunwale, lashed to the ridgerope while providing soundings critical to the ship’s safe navigation. He remained unflinchingly in this dangerous position and gave his soundings with coolness and accuracy under heavy fire guiding the US Fleet through treacherous waters to success and remarkably unharmed. His distinguished bravery was awarded the Medal of Honor.

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Rear Admiral John A. B. Dahlgren 1826-1870 2008 Inductee
Inventor of naval ordnance, including the naval gun named for him and used extensively in the Civil War. He was the Chief Bureau of Naval Ordnance twice, in 1863 and until the end of the Civil War. He commanded the South Atlantic Blockade Squadron, closing the port of Charleston.

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Quarter Gunner John Davis, 1864 2010 Inductee
Served aboard Valley City during action against rebel forts and ships off Elizabeth City, NC on 10 February 1862. When a shell from the shore penetrated the ship’s side and passed through the ammunition magazine, exploding outside the metal screen on the berth deck, several powder protecting bulkheads were torn to pieces and the forward part of the berth deck set on fire. Davis earned the Medal of Honor for courageously covering a barrel of powder with his own body to prevent an explosion, simultaneously passing powder to the upper deck for use with the guns.

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Admiral of the Navy George Dewey: 1854-1917 1998 Inductee
Executive Officer of seven different ships during the Civil War as part of West Gulf Blockade Squadron in the Mississippi River and off the southeast coast of the United States. Was with Admiral Farragut’s ships during the taking of New Orleans. Achieved total victory at Manila Bay on May 1, 1898 in the Spanish-American War, initiating the war’s first action with the words, “You may fire when ready, Gridley.” He is the only person to be given the special rank of "Admiral of the Navy."

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John Ericsson 2007 Inductee
Swedish engineer who came to America where he designed the sloop-of-war Princeton which became the first screw-propelled naval ship steamer and the first warship to have all her machinery below the waterline away from broadside shot. When the Navy needed a response to the ironclad Merrimac, he designed and built in ninety days the highly effective Monitor. He also designed Monitor’s revolutionary concepts: rotating turrets and hoists for raising ammunition from stowage.

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RADM Robley Dunglison "Fighting Bob" Evans, USN 1846 -1912 2013 Inductee
He was a Rear Admiral of the United States Navy, noted for his conduct for the Union Navy and command of the Great White Fleet. Entering the United States Naval Academy in 1860, he was ordered to duty in 1863 due to the American Civil War. He earned acclaim leading a landing force of United States Marines at the Second Battle of Fort Fisher on 15 January, 1865, threatening to kill any man who amputated his wounded leg. Defusing a tense situation with Chile while commanding USS Yorktown in 1892, he earned his nickname and would command the first American battleship: USS Indiana three years later. Evans would also command USS Iowa at the Battle of Santiago de Cuba during the Spanish–American War where he engaged the Spanish Navy but also initiated rescue boats to crew of the sinking Spanish ship VIZCAYA as they were not only beaten by the American Navy but also survivors were being attacked by the Cubans. Rear Admiral Evans commanded the USS Illinois in 1902, and he commanded the Asiatic Fleet from his flagship USS Kentucky and North Atlantic Fleet from USS Maine. USS Connecticut served as his flagship as he led the Great White Fleet from Hampton Roads on 16 April, 1907, through the Atlantic Ocean and Strait of Magellan, circum navigating the globe, until he was relieved of command on 9 May, 1908 at San Francisco due to ill health. The destroyers USS Evans (DD-78) and USS Evans (DD-552) were named for him.

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Admiral David G. Farragut: 1810-1870 1998 Inductee
America's first Rear Admiral, first Vice Admiral and first Admiral, and born of Hispanic heritage. Wounded in the War of 1812 at age 13, lead a landing party against pirates in Cuba in 1823, and commanded the West Gulf Blockade Squadron through most of the Civil War. The city of New Orleans surrendered to him, closing the southern half of the Mississippi. He was the hero of the Battle of Mobile Bay, where he is credited with making the famous statement when encountering mines (then called torpedoes), "Damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead!”

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Rear Admiral Bradley A. Fiske, 1870-1916 2011 Inductee
U.S.'s greatest naval inventor, from the Fiske apparatus or lowering boats in a seaway, the famous Fiske naval telescope sight; the stadimeter, by means of which the distance of a ship can quickly be measured if the height of her mast is know.’ Invented the electric warning whistle, by means of which the alarm is given in the various compartments below when the watertight doors are be closed and the naval electric semaphore and the turret range finder, an optical instrument by means of which an observer can measure his distance from the enemy while he is protected within the turret. Fought with Admiral Dewey at Manila Bay where he was the navigator of the Petrel, and during the battle he arranged an observing station aloft, an there, above the smoke, with the aid of his stadimeter, he dept his commanding officer continually informed of the distance of the enemy and all that was going on in the bay. Highly instrumental in creating the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations.

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Captain Charles V. Gridley, 1863-1898 2014 Inductee
Captain Gridley graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy and served on several ships throughout his 35 years of service. Gridley became Captain in March of 1897 and he took command of USS Olympia in July of 1897. Admiral Dewey was the Commodore of the Asiatic Squadron. Before the battle of Manila Captain Gridley was pronounced unfit for duty. He refused to be relieved of his duties and argued no one else knew the battle plan better and Dewey allowed him to stay. At the beginning of the battle, Dewey uttered the sentence that became one of the most famous statements in American naval history and which immortalized the USS Olympia’s ailing captain: “You may fire when you are ready, Gridley.” After the battle he was relieved, and sent home but died in Kobe, Japan in route to the United States in June 1898. For his gallantry and devotion to duty four United States Navy vessels have been named in his honor.

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Seaman Bolden Reush Harrison, USN 2014 Inductee
On 24 September 1911 he was assigned to USS Pampanga. He was one of a shore party moving in to capture Mundang on the island of Basilan, Philippine Islands. He instantly responded to the calls for help when the advance scout party investigating a group of nipa huts close to the trail, was suddenly taken under point-blank fire and rushed by approximately twenty enemy Moros attacking from inside the huts and from other concealed positions. Armed with a double-barreled shotgun, he concentrated his blasting fire on the outlaws, destroying three of the Moros and assisting in the rout of the remainder. He was awarded the Medal of Honor.

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Rear Admiral Stephen B. Luce, 1841-1910 2007 Inductee
RADM Luce entered the Navy in October 1841 as a Midshipman. He embodied the best of both worlds. His naval career combined the practical experience of sea command with broad academic study and he strongly advocated higher education for the Navy's officers. He became the first President of the newly-established Naval War College at Newport, Rhode Island during 1884-1886. He organized the Naval War College as “a place of original research on all questions relating to war, and to statesmanship connected to war, or the prevention of war. Though retired in March 1889, Rear Admiral Luce remained active in Naval affairs as President of the U.S. Naval Institute until 1898 and, during the first decade of the 1900s, as President of the Naval Academy's Board of Visitors and on special duty at the War College.

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Rear Admiral Alfred Thayer Mahan, 1856-1906 2002 Inductee
Sea power advocate who had a profound effect on world understanding of the role of a strong Navy and its influence upon history. Civil War duty in South Atlantic Blockade and Western Gulf Blockade Squadrons in Pocahontas, Seminole, and James Adger. Commanded Aroostook in Asiatic Squadron; Wasp in South Atlantic Station; Wachusett in Pacific Station; and cruiser Chicago. Twice President of the Naval War College, adviser on naval war strategy during the Spanish American War in 1898, and President of the American Historical Association in 1902. Author of many books and articles, particularly The Influence of Sea Power Upon History 1600-1783; The Influence of Sea Power Upon the French Revolution and Empire; The Gulf and Inland Waters.

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Ordinary Seaman Samuel McAllister, 1900-1903 2014 Inductee
No Image An Irish immigrant, McAllister enlisted in the Navy as an ordinary Seaman and was ordered to serve in the Asiatic Squadron. He reported aboard the USS Newark and is deployed to support US military presence in China and protect US diplomats during the Boxer Rebellion. Newark is dispatched to protect the coalition delegation at Tientsin McAllister is part o a shore party that is engaged by Boxer Rebels outside the city. While under extremely heavy force, McAllister at great danger to himself, leads a group of Sailors crossing the River in a small boat and attacks the Rebels driving them off and destroying their position. For his extraordinary heroism in action against the Boxers at Tientsin China McAllister was awarded the Medal of Honor.

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Lieutenant Commander John McCloy, 1900- 2003 Inductee
As an enlisted man was awarded the Medal of Honor twice for action. First as a Coxswain aboard Newark he lead a landing party that took ammunition ashore to assist the relief expedition of the Allied forces in China in June 1900 and including attacks at PehTsang. The second as Chief Boatswain at Vera Cruz on 22 April 1914 when he was wounded while leading three picket launches along the Vera Cruz sea front to draw Mexican fire to enable Navy cruisers to fire to save men ashore.

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Rear Admiral Edwin Peary, USN 2016 Inductee
He joined the U.S. Navy in 1881 but was granted leaves of absences to pursue his Arctic expeditions to Greenland by dog sled in 1886 and 1891, finding evidence that it was an island. He returned there in 1893 – 94, 1895, and 1896 to transport large meteorites to the U.S. After announcing his intention to reach the North Pole, Peary made several attempts between 1898 and 1905, sailing on a specially built ship and sledding to within 175 miles of the pole. On April 6, 1909, accompanied by Matthew Henson (1866 – 1955) and four Eskimos, he reached what he thought was the pole, and became widely acknowledged as the first explorer to attain that goal. (The claim of his former colleague Frederick A. Cook to have reached the pole in 1908 was later discredited). In 1911 Peary retired from the Navy with the rank of Rear Admiral. Examination of Peary's expedition diary and new documents in the 1980s suggest the point he reached may have been 30 – 60 miles short of the pole.

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Admiral David Dixon Porter, 1829-1891 2000 Inductee
During Civil War received three Congressional votes of thanks for naval operations: lower Mississippi receiving surrender of Forts Jackson and St. Philip when Admiral Farragut took New Orleans; Commander of Mississippi River campaign supporting the successful attack against Vicksburg; Commander North Atlantic Blockade Squadron when Fort Fisher and Wilmington, NC were taken. Second man to achieve four star rank after Admiral Farragut.

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President Theodore Roosevelt: 1896-1909 2017 Inductee
Theodore Roosevelt was among our most influential naval strategists, who thought about the overall planning for the U.S. Navy, its use as a military and diplomatic force, and the movement and disposition of Navy assets. For decades, he strove tirelessly to transform the Navy into a highly capable instrument of an ambitious agenda to turn the U.S. into a great power.

As an undergraduate student at Harvard, Roosevelt started a serious study of the naval aspects of the War of 1812. He wrote The Naval War of 1812 while still at Harvard and finished it in 1882 at age 24. Roosevelt articulated a theory that America’s greatness depended on the robust deployment of sea power. This vision caught the attention of Rear Admiral Stephen B. Luce and Captain Alfred T. Mahan, two important naval leaders and strategists whose own efforts would influence generations of diplomatic and military leaders. As Assistant Secretary of the Navy in the feverish days following the sinking of the USS Maine in 1898, Roosevelt found opportunities to apply his theories. As acting secretary for only a few hours, he mobilized the navy for war with Spain. He ordered supplies and ammunition, sought support from Congress to recruit more sailors, and ordered the North Atlantic and Asiatic Squadrons to prepare for war. As president for nearly eight years, Roosevelt strove tirelessly to develop the navy as the “big stick” of an increasingly ambitious U.S. foreign policy. Working with Congress and the service itself, he increased the size, armament, armor, speed, efficiency, and overall capacity of the Navy and its vessels. Roosevelt deployed The Great White Fleet, 16 battleships that sailed around the world sending a clear signal that the US had global reach and ambitions.

More than any other individual, President Theodore Roosevelt was responsible for creation of the modern, blue-water Navy and its deployments to promote an ambitious foreign policy.

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Lieutenant William Seach, 1900- 2006 Inductee
As an Ordinary Seaman assigned to Newark during the Boxer Rebellion in June 1900. On 13 June, cited for courage in repulsing an attack by 300 Chinese Imperialist soldiers and Boxer militants with a bayonet charge; on 20 June, during a day-long battle, he ran across an open clearing to clean out nests of Chinese snipers; on 21 June defended gun emplacements during a surprise saber attack by Chinese cavalrymen; on 22 June, he breached the wall of a Chinese fort, fighting his way to enemy guns and assisted in turning the cannon upon the defenders of the fort. He was awarded the Medal of Honor.

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Admiral William S. Sims: 1880-1922 Year
One of the great reformers in naval gunfire and employment of destroyer ships. Commander of U.S. Naval Forces in European waters during World War I, he adopted the use of naval convoys and promoted the construction of destroyers to counter Germany’s use of unrestricted submarine warfare. He served as President of the Naval War College in 1917 and from 1919 to 1922. His book on Anglo-American naval cooperation in the war at sea during World War I, Victory at Sea, won the Pulitzer Prize in history in 1920.

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Quartermaster Peter Williams 1862- Year
No Image On the morning of 9 March 1862, the CSS Virginia (formerly the USS Merrimack) and the USS Monitor faced off in Hampton Roads, Virginia, to fight the first battle between ironclad ships. Quartermaster Peter Williams was at the Monitor's helm, sharing the tiny pilothouse with the Captain, Lieutenant John Worden. As Captain Worden and Williams maneuvered around the Virginia's stern; Worden peered through the forward viewing slit just as an enemy shell slammed into the pilothouse. Worden had taken much of the blast and was blinded and was taken to his cabin. Quartermaster Williams was thrown from the helm to his hands and knees. He was not seriously injured and resumed the helm of the Monitor and took control of the ship’s maneuvering until the Executive Officer, who was well aft in the ship, could get to the pilot house. During this interval, Williams was in sole control of the ironclad. On 3 April 1863, Quartermaster Peter Williams was awarded the Medal of Honor for his heroic action, independently maneuvering the ship while engaged in heavy combat.

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World Wars 1915-1945

Rear Admiral Richard N. Antrim, 1931-1954 2003 Inductee
Assigned to battleship New York, cruiser Portland, and destroyers Crowninshield, Bittern, and Pope. As Damage Control Officer of Pope, attached to the Asiatic Fleet at the outbreak of World War II, participated in the Battles of Makassar Strait, Badoeng Strait, and Java Sea. While escorting two British ships, encountered four Japanese heavy cruisers and four Japanese destroyers in the Java Sea. Although the British ships were sunk ships, Pope was eventually destroyed by Japanese aircraft, with Antrim receiving the Navy Cross. As Prisoner of War, he earned the Bronze Star Medal when he was forced to construct slit trenches for the Japanese POW’s for bomb protection: he constructed them in a fashion to spell out from the sky “U.S.”, which the Japanese never realized but, if they had, would have resulted in his beheading. Also as POW, he earned the Medal of Honor when another POW was near death from being subjected to a frenzied clubbing and kicking by four Japanese guards before the entire Japanese guard force; he stepped forward and told them he would take the remainder of the punishment in place of the officer, so stunning the Japanese that the officer was spared, gaining new respect for all POW’s that resulted in improved camp living conditions. After the war, was Commanding Officer of Turner and transport Montrose.

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Commander Frederick J. Becton, USN 2011 Inductee
Received first Silver Star as Commander while serving as Operations Officer on the Staff of Destroyer Squadron TWENTY-ONE in a Solomon Island Area from 5 to 13 July and 17-18 August 1943. Controlled and coordinated the attacks of the vanguard destroyers in sinking enemy ships and destroyed two destroyers and damaged one destroyer and annihilated a number of landing barges. Other Silver Stars were received as CO of USS LAFFEY, during battles in Leyte, Okinawa and assault at Luzon. Navy Cross was awarded while he was CO of USS LAFFEY DD 724, in action against Japanese forces off Okinawa on 16 April 1945. With his ship under attack by hostile planes, Becton countered by employing every conceivable maneuver and directed all his guns in an intense and fired on enemy. LAFFEY fought for over two hours and received heavy personnel casualties and severe structural damage. He directed emergency repairs in the midst of combat and emerged at the close of the action still afloat and fighting. Becton received a Navy Cross and four Silver Stars during his career.

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Admiral William S. Benson, USN 2016 Inductee
He was the first Chief of Naval Operations (CNO). He served in Yantic as part of the Greely Relief Expedition in 1883 as well as served in Hartford, Essex, Constitution, and Alliance. He was the Executive Officer in Iowa and Commanding Officer of Albany, Missouri and Utah. As first Chief of Naval Operations (1915-1919); organized and centralized the Navy's administration prior to and during World War I, establishing the office as a viable entity. He was the principal naval adviser at Armistice in 1919.

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Captain Aaron F. Beyer, USN 1933-1963 2013 Inductee
He served as a Naval Reservist, volunteering for active duty in 1940 and serving aboard destroyer escort Impulse, before commanding patrol craft 589, destroyer escort Wileman and Raymond. As a Commander, awarded the Navy Cross for his gallant and heroic action as Commanding Officer of Raymond in action in the waters off Samar during the Battle of Leyte Gulf in World War II. Where against a vastly superior force of Japanese cruisers and battleships on 25 October 1944 he repeatedly attacked that force thus preventing them from breaking through and attacking the extremely vulnerable escort carrier force supporting the landing force at Leyte Gulf. In particular he engaged Japanese cruiser Haguro at 6,000 yards with torpedoes and five-inch gunfire scoring several disabling hits on that ship. He ended the war assigned to the Staff of COMSERVPAC. Subsequently, he transferred to the regular Navy and was assigned to transports Arthur Middleton and Okaloosa; he commanded destroyer Brinkley Bass, earning the Bronze Star during the Korean War. His final command was the ammunition ship Katmai.

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Watertender First Class Elmer Charles Bigelow, 1941- 2004 Inductee
While aboard Fletcher engaging Japanese forces off Corregidor Island on 14 February 1945, an enemy projectile penetrated No. 1 gun powder magazine, setting a raging fire. Without time to don breathing apparatus, he took two fire extinguishers into the acrid smoke and he succeeded in stopping the fire and saving the ship. He succumbed to his injuries. Awarded the Medal of Honor.

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Vice Admiral John D. Bulkeley, USN 1941-1996 2005 Inductee
DescriptThe most renowned PT-boat leader of World War II. Operated Motor Torpedo Boat Squadron Three out of the Philippines from August 1941 until he evacuated General MacArthur in April 1942. Took command of MTB Squadron Seven in the Southwest Pacific and led it from February 1943 through September 1944 in the New Guinea campaign. Brought MTB Squadron Two in commission in March 1944 and commanded PT Squadron 102 during the D-Day landings at Normandy in June 1944. In July 1944 assumed command of destroyer Endicott sinking two German corvettes in one surface action in August 1944 in the Mediterranean. At the end of World War II was in command of Stribling, and had subsequent commands of Destroyer Division 132 during the Korean War. After that war became Chief of Staff to Commander Cruiser Division Five. After a tour on the Joint Chiefs of Staff, commanded oiler Tolovana, Destroyer Squadron 12 and Naval Base Guantanamo. Eventually had command of Cruiser Destroyer Flotilla Eight before becoming President of the Board of Inspection and Survey from 1967 until his death in 1996. Awarded the Medal of Honor, Army Distinguished Service Cross, Navy Cross, Silver Star, and Navy Distinguished Service Medal.ion

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Admiral Arleigh A. Burke: 1923-1961 1998 Inductee
Gunnery expert who achieved fame as Commander of Destroyer Squadron 23 in defeating the Japanese in the Southwest Pacific theater at the Battle of Empress Augusta Bay and the Battle of Cape St. George, sinking numerous Japanese ships. As Chief of Staff to Task Force 58, assisted in planning and executing victories in Hollandia, Saipan, Battle of the Philippine Sea, Battle of Leyte Gulf, Iwo Jima and Okinawa. He was the head of Op-23 during the controversies of the late 1940’s, Commander Cruiser Division Five during the Korean War, and a United Nations delegate to the truce talks in Korea. The longest serving Chief of Naval Operations (six years), he ensured the development of missile weapon systems and nuclear power propulsion systems for both the surface and the subsurface forces.

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Admiral Robert B. Carney, USN 1917-1955 2003 Inductee
During World War I served aboard destroyer Fanning as gunnery and torpedo officer, contributing to the sinking of German submarine U-58. Served aboard destroyer Laub, then transferred as Executive Officer and then Commanding Officer of destroyers Reno, and then Rathburne. Taught navigation at the Naval Academy in mid-12920’s, and then served as Flag Secretary to Commander Battleship Division Four, Commander Battleship Divisions, and then Commander-in-Chief Battle Fleet. Served as Gunnery Officer aboard light cruiser Cincinnati, and then had command of destroyers Buchanan and Reid, and attack cargo ship Sirius. As Chief of Staff to the Atlantic Support Force at the outset of World War II, developed convoy and ASW techniques for the Battle of the Atlantic. Then became commissioning skipper of light cruiser Denver. After promotion to Rear Admiral because Chief of Staff to Admiral Halsey in the Third Fleet for the remainder of the War. Post World War II assignments include DCNO for Logistics, Commander Second Fleet, Commander-in Chief U.S. Naval Forces in the Eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean. Served as Chief of Naval Operations from July 1953 until August 1955.

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Gunner’s Mate Third Class Paul H. Carr, 1942-1944 2001 Inductee
Posthumously awarded the Silver Star for heroism in action during the Battle off Samar in World War II against vastly superior Japanese forces. He was the five-inch gun captain aboard his destroyer escort Samuel B. Roberts, firing over 300 rounds against enemy cruisers at close range, knocking out an enemy eight-inch turret, demolishing her bridge, and starting fires. Although his ship was damaged and he had to fire six rounds without the safety device of gas-ejection air, his gun was ultimately wrecked by a powder charge cook-off, killing three of the gun crew and horribly wounding Petty Officer Carr from his neck to his thigh. Although the order was given to abandon ship as his ship was sinking, Petty Officer Carr died still trying to load and ram the final shell available.

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Rear Admiral Robert W. Copeland, USNR, 1935-1965 2006 Inductee
A reserve officer, trained as a lawyer, called to active duty in 1940, he commanded yard craft Pawtucket, Black Douglas and destroyer escort Wyman. As a Lieutenant Commander, he commissioned destroyer escort Samuel B. Roberts in April 1944; she was sunk by the Japanese during the Battle off Samar on 25 October 1944. He was awarded the Navy Cross as Commanding Officer while engaging vastly superior Japanese surface ships, trying to divert heavy cruisers and battleships from American carriers. His ship expended torpedoes and five-inch gunfire with her guns firing in manual, local control while sustaining three 14 - inch hits, turning the ship into an inert mass of battered metal, losing eighty-nine of her crew of 178. After shore assignments, he was released from active duty in January 1946, returning to the practice law but remaining a participant in the Naval Reserve achieving flag rank in 1961.

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Commander Jesse Grant Coward, USN (Ret) 1900-1963 2015 Inductee
Commander Coward was the Commanding Officer of the USS Sterett (DD-407) during an engagement with Japanese naval forces near Savo Island on the night of 12-13 November, 1942. On this occasion the squadron to which Sterett was attached engaged the Japanese at close quarters and defeated what was a superior enemy force, inflicting heavy damage and preventing them from accomplishing their intended mission. His skillful war fighting, daring and determination contributed significantly to the victory and was key to eliminating Japanese forces in the vicinity of Savo Island. He was awarded the Navy Cross for this action. Later in the war Captain Coward served as Commander, Destroyer Squadron FIFTY-FOUR, in an action against Japanese forces in the Surigao Strait during the Battle for Leyte Gulf in the Philippine Islands. On the night of 25 October 1944, Although illuminated by Japanese searchlights and subjected to heavy enemy fire, Commodore Coward brought his ships to within short range of several enemy Battleships and Cruisers, launched a daring torpedo attack, which inflicted severe damage on the enemy, he then ordered his squadron to retire without loss or injury to any of his combatants. The successful attack contributed in large measure to eliminating an imminent and dangerous threat to our transports and other ships conducting Landings on the beaches of Leyte. His high professional skill, forceful leadership, and gallant devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

For his actions Capt Coward was awarded his second Navy Cross. He retired from the Navy with the rank of Rear Admiral.

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Commander George F. Davis, 1934-1945 2012 Inductee
CDR Davis served aboard the commissioning crew of cruiser Tuscaloosa, then aboard destroyers Broome and Hopkins before assignment on battleship Oklahoma, which he was aboard during the Pearl Harbor attack. He was assigned to the cruiser Honolulu as the Damage Control Officer during Aleutians Campaign, Battles of Tassafaronga, Kula Gulf, Kolombangara, Palau and Leyte earning the Legion of Merit. In December 1944, he became Commanding Officer of destroyer Walke. While on detached duty protecting minesweepers, preparatory to the Invasion at Lingayan Gulf in January 1945, he maneuvered his ship to destroy two Japanese Kamikazes. Although a third hit his bridge and enveloped it in flames, he conned his ship clear to engage and destroy a fourth Kamikaze to prevent its hitting his ship, and then succumbed to his wounds. He was awarded the Medal of Honor.

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Commander Ernest Edwin Evans, 1931-1944 2001 Inductee
First ten years of service were aboard Colorado, Roper, Rathburne, Pensacola, Chaumont, Cahokia, and Black Hawk. In August 1941, assigned as Executive Officer aboard Alden, earning a Legion of Merit in sinking a Japanese submarine in January 1942. Assigned command of Alden from March 1942 until July 1943 when ordered to be the commissioning Commanding Officer of destroyer Johnston. Earned a Bronze Star Medal with Johnston’s probable sinking of a Japanese submarine in May 1944. Awarded the Medal of Honor as Commanding Officer of Johnston in action in the Battle off Samar in World War II against vastly superior Japanese surface ships on 25 October 1944. Surprised by the sudden appearance of a major Japanese force of 6 heavy cruisers, 2 light cruisers, 4 battleships and 12 destroyers, CDR Evans advised his crew to “prepare to attack major portion of Japanese Fleet.” He then gallantly diverted the superior enemy battleships and cruisers fire away from the lightly armed and armored U.S. aircraft carriers he was screening, being the first to lay a smoke screen and the first to launch a torpedo attack. Wounded early in the battle, outshooting and outmaneuvering the enemy, he consistently interposed his vessel between the hostile fleet units and the American carriers engaging an enemy heavy cruiser line at 10,000 yards. After suffering a crippling loss of engine power from enemy battleships 14” shells, he lost communications with after-steering, but shifted command to the fantail and shouted steering orders through an open hatch to men turning the rudder by hand. His ship fought furiously for three hours, causing Japanese destroyers and cruisers to prematurely launch torpedoes against the American carriers at excessive range. Surrounded by enemy cruisers and destroyers, Johnston sank losing 186 of her crew of 327. The last to leave his ship before it went down, CDR Evans was never rescued from the water.

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Admiral Frank Jack Fletcher, 1906-1946 2004 Inductee
Medal of Honor winner at Vera Cruz prior to WWI. Served aboard Rhode Island, Ohio, Eagle, Main, Franklin, Chauncey, Dale, Florida, and Tennessee. During WWI commanded Margaret, Allen, and Beham. After the war commanded Gridley, Whipple, Sacramento, Rainbow. Executive Officer of Colorado. Chief of Staff to CINC Asiatic Fleet. Commanded New Mexico and Cruiser Divison Three and Six. As Commander Task Force 17 and 6 participated in all early naval campaigns against the Japanese at Battles of Coral Sea, Midway, and Guadalcanal. Commanded Alaska Sea Frontier at the end of the war.

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Captain Amos T. Hathaway: 1935-1965 2009 Inductee
Served aboard battleship Mississippi, destroyer Craven, cruiser Boise, minelayer Sane before becoming executive officer of destroyer Hoel. In April 1944, assigned as Commanding Officer of destroyer Heermann. Awarded the Navy Cross as Commanding Officer of Heermann in action in the Battle off Samar in World War II against vastly superior Japanese surface ships on 25 October 1944. He engaged Japanese heavy cruiser Haguro at 9,000 yards. He then engaged the Japanese battleship Haruna at 4,000 yards. He then engaged heavy cruisers Chikuma and Tone, which turned away and retired from the battle because of his ship's actions. While protecting USS Gambier Bay, Heerman took hits from four enemy ships. He was on the Far East Command during the Korean War, earning an Army Legion of Merit. He subsequently was Commander Destroyer Division 92, Chief of Staff to CARDIV 16, and Commanding Officer of transport Opanogan.

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Vice Admiral Robert W. Hayler, 1914-1951 2003 Inductee
Aboard Georgia during Vera Cruz campaign of 1914 and Oklahoma during WW I. Commanded destroyers Howard and Melvin with three shore tours at Torpedo Station Newport, RI. At WWII outbreak, commissioned and commanded Torpedo Station Alexandria, VA to manufacture torpedoes. In June 1942 took command of cruiser Honolulu and participated in Guadalcanal battles including Savo Island on 30 November 1942 (first Navy Cross). Fought in Battle of Kula Gulf 5-6 July 1943 (second Navy Cross) and one week later in Battle of Kolombangra (Silver Star Medal). Departed Honolulu in March 1944, promoted to Rear Admiral and given command of Cruiser Division 12, participating in Saipan, Tinian, and Guam (first Legion of Merit with Combat V), Palau, and Leyte Gulf (second Legion of Merit with Combat V). Providing AA protection of TF 58 in June 1944 received secon Bronze Star with Combat V. Led cruiser line on left flank of Surigao Strait on 25 October 1944 (third Navy Cross). Detached to General Board in December 1944, his last tour was as Commandant of Sixth Naval District 1948-1951.

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Chief Boatswain’s Mate Edwin Joseph Hill, 1941- 2003 Inductee
When it was determined during the attack at Pearl Harbor that the Nevada would get underway, he disregarded his safety during the strafing and bombing to go to the quay and cast off all lines. He swam back to his ship. Later while on the forecastle, when it was ordered to anchor or ground the ship, he was on the exposed forecastle attempting to let go the anchors when Japanese bombs blew him overboard and took his life. He was awarded the Medal of Honor.

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Seaman First Class Johnnie D. Hutchins 2000 Inductee
While on the bridge of his LST that was participating on the assault of Lae, New Guinea on 4 September 1943, his ship was under simultaneous attack from shore batteries and enemy airplanes. While an aerial torpedo was heading to his ship, the ship was also struck with a bomb. Although mortally wounded by the bomb explosion, Petty Officer Hutchins used all of his strength to seize the helm and maneuver his ship clear of the advancing torpedo. He was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor.

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Gunner's Mate First Class Osmond K. Ingram, USN, 1903-1917 2013 Inductee
In the course of his Naval career, he advanced to the rank of Gunner's Mate First Class and, during World War I, served on board the destroyer Cassin. On 15 October 1917, while his ship was operating off the Irish coast, she was attacked by the German submarine U-61. Gunner's Mate Ingram spotted an incoming torpedo and, realizing that it could hit near the depth charges at the ship's stern ran aft in an attempt to release them before the torpedo arrived. However, the torpedo struck the ship before he could achieve his purpose and Ingram was killed in the ensuing explosion. For his "extraordinary heroism" on this occasion, he was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor. Also noteworthy for being the first U.S. Navy enlisted man killed in action during World War I. USS Osmond Ingram (DD-255, later AVD-9 and APD-35), 1919-1946, was named in honor of Gunner's Mate First Class Osmond K. Ingram.

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Boatswain’s Mate First Class Reinhardt John Keppler, 1942- 2005 Inductee
Awarded the Medal of Honor for Repair Party work aboard San Francisco during the 12-13 November battles in the Solomon Islands. When a enemy torpedo plane crashed on the after machine-gun platform, he removed the wounded and saved lives of shipmates who would have perished. That night, when the ship’s hanger was set afire by enemy projectiles off Savo Island, he bravely led a hose into the area and without assistance brought the fire under control. Later in the battle amid bursting shells, he directed fire fighting and assistance to wounded personnel, until he died from loss of blood.

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Admiral Isaac C. Kidd, Jr USN 2016 Inductee
During World War II, he was assigned to destroyer Cowie, participating in the invasions of North Africa, Sicily, and Italy. He transferred to destroyer Putnam as commissioning Gunnery Officer where he participated in campaigns at Saipan, Tinian, Leyte Gulf, and Okinawa, earning the Bronze Star. He became Gunnery and then Operations Officer aboard cruiser Salem, before assuming command of destroyer minesweeper Ellyson. He was assigned as Commissioning Commanding Officer of destroyer Barry; followed by Commander Destroyer Division 322, Commander Destroyer Squadron 32, and then eventually, DESRON 18, the first Navy all guided missile squadron. He was Senior Aide to the CNO before serving as Chief of Staff for Logistics to CINC Allied Forces, Southern Europe. Later assignments included Commander Cruiser-Destroyer Flotilla 12, Commander First Fleet, Commander Sixth Fleet, Chief of Naval Material, and CINCLANTFLT.

Additional awards include three Distinguished Service Medals and three Legion of Merits.

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Rear Admiral Sheldon Hoard Kinney 1941-1972 2006 Inductee
RADM Kinney’s 38- year naval career included distinguished combat service in three wars, and took him from Signalman to Admiral. He commanded the USS Bronstein during World War II and during one night Bronstein sank two U-boats and put a third out of action. “By his outstanding professional skill, courage and determined efforts throughout a four and one-half hour period, Commander Kinney was directly instrumental in saving three friendly vessels from probable torpedoing, in destroying two enemy submarines and in seriously damaging a third. His actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service” For his bold action, Kinney, the youngest man to command a Navy destroyer, received the Navy Cross. The remainder of his career was just as distinguished. He served as Commander Cruiser Destroyer Forces Pacific, and in 1967, became Commandant of the U.S. Naval Academy. After retiring in 1972, Sheldon Kinney served 10 years as President of the State University of New York Maritime College at Fort Schulyer, committing himself wholeheartedly to maritime education.

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Captain Leon S. Kintberger, 1932-1962 2005 Inductee
Served aboard battleship New York, cruiser Minneapolis, and destroyers Evans, Gridley, Argonne and Bernadou. During World War II he had command of destroyers Charles Lawrence and Coolbaugh before taking command of destroyer Hoel. Awarded the Navy Cross as Commanding Officer of destroyer Hoel in action in the Battle off Samar in World War II against vastly superior Japanese surface ships on 25 October 1944. He engaged Japanese battleship Kongo, opening gunfire attacks at 14,000 yards, launching torpedoes at 9,000 yards. With three fifths of her guns knocked out, he engaged the enemy heavy cruiser column with his remaining guns and torpedoes at 6,000 yards. Caught between the cruiser column and the battleship column, she continued to fight for over one hour and five minutes, expending over 500 rounds of five-inch ammunition. She was hit over 40 times by enemy 5,8 and 16 inch shells, armor piercing that went right through, punching holes below the waterline that eventually sunk Hoel. He subsequently was given command of destroyer Zellars and participated in the Okinawa campaign where his ship destroyed seven Japanese suicide plans and he earned the Silver Star. He subsequently had command of Destroyer Division 22, transport Hoble and destroyer leader Norfolk. His final assignment was on the staff of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

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Captain Donald J MacDonald, 1943 2014 Inductee
Graduated from U.S. Naval Academy 1931. He served on numerous ships until 1938 and was a White House Naval Aide until 1940. He then served as Special Naval Observer, American Embassy, London England with addition duty as Aide to Vice Admiral Robert L Ghormley, USN. Upon return he served as commissioning Executive Officer of USS O’Bannon. He assumed command in 1943 and during his service participated in the capture and defense of Guadalcanal; Guadalcanal Third Savo; and the Rennel Island Operation; the consolidation of the Solomons; New Georgia-Rendova Occupation;Kula Gulf action, Kolombangara action, Vella Lavella occupation and action off Vella Lavella. For heroism and distinguished service he was awarded Navy Cross and Gold Star in lieu of a second Navy Cross; the Legion of Merit and a Gold Star in lieu of a second Legion of Merit; the Silver Star Medal and two Gold Stars in lieu of the second and third Silver Star Medal; and the Bronze Star Medal and a Gold Star in lieu of the Second Bronze Star Medal.

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Ship’s Cook Third Class Doris Miller: 1939-1943 1998 Inductee
Petty Officer Miller served aboard Pyro, West Virginia, Nevada, Indianapolis, and Liscome Bay. During the attack at Pearl Harbor at the start of World War II, Petty Officer Miller earned the Navy Cross for assisting the mortally wounded Commanding Officer of West Virginia from the bridge to safety, and then manning and operating a machine gun directed at enemy Japanese attacking aircraft. He was posthumously awarded the Purple Heart when Liscome Bay was sunk by an enemy submarine in 1943.

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Vice Admiral Frederick Moosebrugger, 1923-1955 2008 Inductee
Served aboard Nevada, Yangtze Patrol, Truxtun, Brazos, Houston, Tennessee. Commanded McCall, participating in the strikes against Gilberts, Marshals, Wake, and Marcus. He was Commander Destroyer Division 11 and 12 in the Solomons and supported landings at New Georgia and Rendova. He directed the sinking of three Japanese destroyers in the Battle of Vella Gulf. He was COMDESRON 63 during Iwo Jima and Okinaw and responsible for fending off kamikazes attacks on Okinawa. Commanding Officer of Springfield and Prairie. Bombarded Korea as Commander Cruiser Division Five and was Superintendent of Naval Post Graduate School in Monterey.

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Signalman First Class Douglas Albert Munro, U. S. Coast Guard 2005 Inductee
Only Coast Guardsman, in the 213-year history of the service, awarded the Medal of Honor. For extraordinary heroism and conspicuous gallantry in action above and beyond the call of duty as Petty Officer in Charge of a group of 24 Higgins boats, engaged in the evacuation of a battalion of marines trapped by enemy Japanese forces at Point Cruz, Guadalcanal, on 27 September 1942. After making preliminary plans for the evacuation of nearly 500 beleaguered marines, Munro, under constant strafing by enemy machine-guns on the island, and at great risk of his life, daringly led 5 of his small craft toward the shore. As he closed the beach, he signaled the others to land, and then in order to draw the enemy's fire and protect the heavily loaded boats, he valiantly placed his craft with its 2 small guns as a shield between the beachhead and the Japanese. When the perilous task of evacuation was nearly completed, Munro was instantly killed by enemy fire, but his crew, 2 of whom were wounded, carried on until the last boat had loaded and cleared the beach. By his outstanding leadership, expert planning, and dauntless devotion to duty, he and his courageous comrades undoubtedly saved the lives of many who otherwise would have perished. He gallantly gave his life for his country.

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Admiral Jesse B. Oldendorf, 1909-1948 2005 Inductee
Served aboard California, Preble, Denver Whipple, San Diego, Hannibal and Saratoga. Sunk by U-boat aboard President Lincoln in WWI. Served aboard Seattle, Patricia, Niagara, Birmingham. Commanded Decatur, navigator of New York, exec West Virginia, commanded Houston. Commanded western Atlantic convoy escorts at start of WWII. Then became battleship cruiser support commander for Marshalls, Truk-Palaus, Marianas, Peleliu, and Leyte Gulf. Capped the Japanese “T” at Surigao Strait, destroying the Japanese southern strike force earning the Navy Cross. Wounded off Okinawa.

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Chief Watertender Oscar Verner Peterson, 1942 2006 Inductee
As Repair Party Leader aboard oiler Neosho during an attack by Japanese aircraft in the Battle of the Coral Sea, his party was all killed or wounded. Although wounded himself, he entered a fire room and closed a bulkhead stop valve, receiving burns that resulted in his death but assisted the ship in continuing to fight. He was awarded the Medal of Honor.

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Ship's Cook, 2/c Forrest O. Rednour, USCG 1941-1943 2017 Inductee
For heroic conduct while serving in Coast Guard Cutter Escanaba during the rescue of survivors from a torpedoed ship, (the Dorchester), in North Atlantic waters. Despite possible enemy submarine action, Rednour risked his life in the black and icy waters to aid in the rescue of unconscious and helpless survivors. Realizing the danger of being crushed between the rafts and the ship's side or of being struck by a propeller blade if the engines backed, he swam in under the stern of the constantly maneuvering Escanaba and prevented many floating survivors from being caught in the suction of the screws, in one instance retrieving a loaded raft. Rednour's gallant and voluntary action in subjecting himself to pounding seas and bitter cold for nearly four hours contributed to the rescue of 145 persons. Rednour worked the longest of all retrievers and accounted for the greatest number of survivors. He was awarded the Navy & Marine Corps Medal during World War II.

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Gunner’s Mate Third Class James Ralph Reid, Jr. 2012 Inductee
No Image On 21 August 1945 serving with Naval Group (China) his Allied junk manned by 7 Americans and 20 Chinese guerrillas was attacked by a heavily-armed Japanese junk (crew of 83) while enroute from Haimen to Shanghai, China. His group was attacked by a heavily-armed Japanese junk. Though his craft was under heavy fire, and the enemy's first round, from a 75-mm. pack howitzer, carried away the foremast of Gunner's Mate Reid's junk, he coolly and deliberately carried a bazooka run to the bow where in an extremely exposed position he scored four direct hits on the enemy vessel. He fired and reloaded his weapon in a highly skillful manner with utter disregard for his own personal safety. When his junk had closed to within 50 feet of the enemy, Gunner's Mate Reid further distinguished himself by climbing upon the rail and hurled a grenade into the hatch of the enemy craft inflicting heavy casualties and loss of life, whereupon the enemy ran up a white flag of surrender. He was awarded a Navy Cross in what proved to be the last surface action of World War II.

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Coxswain Samuel B. Roberts, Jr 1939-1942 2007 Inductee
He enlisted in the U.S. Naval Reserve in 1939 and was called to active duty in 1940. Roberts served aboard the USS CALIFORNIA (BB 44) and the USS HEYWOOD (AD12), before being transferred to the troop transport USS BELLATRIX (AKA 20). Early on the morning of 27 September 1942, Roberts volunteered for a rescue mission to save a company size unit of Marines who had been surrounded by a numerically superior Japanese force. Initially, the rescue group of several Hogging boats was taken under heavy fire and were perilously close to failure. Realizing the state of the rescue mission, Roberts unselfishly volunteered to distract Japanese forces by passing directly in front of their lines drawing fire to his boat. This decoy act was performed effectively until all Marines had been evacuated. However, as he was about to withdraw from the range of the Japanese guns, Roberts' boat was hit and he was mortally wounded. For his valor and courage in the face of the enemy fire he was awarded posthumously the Navy Cross. Three U.S. Navy ships have been named in honor of Coxswain Samuel B. Roberts, Jr.

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Captain Donald K. Ross, 1929-1956 2009 Inductee
Served aboard various ships in the 1930’s as an enlisted machinist, and was a Warrant aboard the battleship Nevada at Pearl Harbor. During the attack, his station in the forward dynamo room became almost untenable due to smoke, steam and heat. Ross’ citation reads "he forced his men to leave that station and performed all the duties himself until blinded and unconscious. Upon being rescued and resuscitated, he returned and secured the forward dynamo room and proceeded to the after dynamo room, where he was later again rendered unconscious by exhaustion. Upon recovering consciousness, he returned to his station, where he remained until directed to abandon it." He was awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions at Pearl Harbor. Ross was promoted to Chief Machinist in March 1942 and was commissioned an Ensign in June 1942. Subsequent assignments included Engineering Officer aboard Nevada, oiler Platt, carrier Kearsarge, and the Board of Inspection and Survey. He rose steadily in temporary rank to Lieutenant Commander by the end of the war, reverting to Lieutenant at its conclusion. Upon his retirement from active duty in July 1956, after twenty-seven years' of service aboard every type of surface ship then afloat, he was promoted to Captain on the basis of his combat awards.

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Rear Admiral Herbert E. Schonland, 1925-1947 2001 Inductee
Served aboard Utah, Lawrence, Camden, and Bushell during first seven years of commissioned service. Received torpedo training instruction and then served aboard Milwaukee and Argonne in the 1930’s. Assigned to heavy cruiser San Francisco as Damage Control Officer in 1939. During the Battle of Savo Island 12-13 November 1942 in World War II against superior Japanese forces, then LCDR Schonland fought to sustain San Francisco after the ship suffered severe damage from numerous Japanese major caliber hits and torpedoes. When all officers senior to him were killed, he assumed command, assured himself that the ship was operating properly from the bridge, and then returned below decks to direct damage control. In water waist deep and without electrical power, he restored stability to the ship, achieved watertight integrity, and pumped-off all flooding. Through his great courage and initiative, the ship was saved and returned to port under its own power. He was awarded the Medal of Honor and promoted to Commander. Subsequently assigned to shore facilities in the Pacific, he was promoted to Captain in 1944 and retired as a Rear Admiral in 1947.

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Admiral Raymond Spruance: 1906-1948 1998 Inductee
An Ensign during the Great White Fleet tour, executive officer of a troop transport in World War I, and three tours at the Naval War College including President before retirement. The afloat commander who crushed the Japanese at the Battle of Midway, and as Commander Fifth Fleet, achieved victories in World War II in the Battle of Philippine Sea, Iwo Jima , and Okinawa. Considered the most brilliant fleet commander in World War II.

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Captain Dorothy C. Stratton, USCGR (W) 1942-1946 2017 Inductee
Born in Brookfield, Missouri on 24 March 1899. She attended Ottawa University in Kansas, earning a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1920. She alternated between teaching at high schools and studying, receiving a Master of Arts in Psychology from the University of Chicago and Doctor of Philosophy in Student Personnel Administration from Columbia University. She joined the staff of Purdue University in 1933 as Dean of Women and Assistant Professor of Psychology and was promoted to full Professor in 1940. She took a leave of absence from Purdue in June, 1942 and joined the United States Navy as a senior lieutenant in the Women's Reserve of the U.S. Naval Reserve (WAVES), where she attended the first class of the U.S. Naval Training Station at Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts. After completing her training she was assigned as Assistant to the Commanding Officer of the radio school for enlisted WAVES at Madison, Wisconsin.

She became the first woman to be accepted for service in the Women's Reserve of the Coast Guard soon after President Franklin Roosevelt signed an amendment to Public Law 773 that created a women's reserve program for the nation's oldest continuous-sea service. Her transfer to the Coast Guard as the Director of that service's Women's Reserve occurred on 24 November 1942 and she was promoted to the rank of lieutenant commander. She was promoted to commander in December, 1943 and captain in February, 1944. One of her first contributions to the Coast Guard was creating the name SPAR for the Women's Reserve, which she discovered in the first letters of the Coast Guard's motto "Semper Paratus" and its English translation "Always Ready". In her memo to the Commandant, she noted "The initials of [the Coast Guard's motto] are, of course, SPAR. At the peak of Coast Guard’s strength in late 1944, one out of every 15 or 16 enlisted persons was a woman and one out of every 12 or 13 officers was a SPAR officer, the highest ratio of women-to-men of any of the armed services at that time.

As Director of the Women's Reserve of the U.S. Coast Guard Reserve, Captain Stratton was primarily responsible for originating policies for the procurement, training, utilization, and maintenance or morale of members of the SPARs. Through her qualities of leadership, Captain Stratton inspired the finest type of woman to volunteer her services to her country. Through her keen understanding of the abilities of women, her vision of the jobs which they could perform, and her consummate tact in fitting women into a military organization, she was able to direct the efforts of the women of the Reserve into channels of the greatest usefulness to the Coast Guard and to the country. In 2001 the Coast Guard Women's Leadership Association named its "Captain Dorothy Stratton Leadership Award" in her honor and in 2008 the Coast Guard named its third National Security Cutter WMSL-752 in her honor.

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Vice Admiral Joseph K. Taussig 1895-1947 2007 Inductee
Taussig entered the Naval Academy in 1895. As a midshipman, he served on the flagship, the armored cruiser New York (ACR-2), during the Battle of Santiago in the Spanish-American War. Following his graduation he was assigned to cruiser Newark (C-1) and participated in the Allied Peking Relief Expedition during the Boxer Rebellion. In July 1916, after serving in battleships, cruisers, destroyers, and on staffs afloat, Taussig took command of Division 8, Destroyer Force, the first group of American destroyers sent abroad during World War I. After crossing the storm and gale filled Atlantic, CDR Taussig was asked by the Commander in Chief of the Coasts of Ireland when he would be ready for sea. Taussig replied in the now famous words; “We are ready now, Sir.” He received the Distinguished Service Medal for World War I service. After the war, he continued to serve the Navy at home and abroad. In 1922, his ship, the protected cruiser Cleveland (CL-21), rendered assistance to the victims of an earthquake and tidal wave in Chile. He served at the Naval War College from 1923 to 1926, and also saw duty in the Bureau of Navigation, as Assistant Chief of Naval Operations, and as Commandant, 5th Naval District, in addition to commanding a battleship division and cruiser scouting force. In April, 1940, RADM Taussig testified before the US Senate Naval Affairs Committee that war with Japan was inevitable. Vice Admiral Taussig retired in 1941, but was recalled to active duty in 1943 to serve in the office of the Secretary of the Navy until 1 June 1947, only a few months before his death 29 October 1947.

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Chief Watertender Peter Tomich, 1941- 2003 Inductee
During the attack at Pearl Harbor, he remained at his Engineering Dept. station although he realized the ship was capsizing as a result of enemy bombing and torpedoing. He ensured all boilers were secured properly and all fire room personnel had been evacuated first, and by so doing gave his life. Awarded the Medal of Honor.

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Yeoman Second Class William Tremblay, 1942- 2006 Inductee
No Image Assigned to the ship’s office on a fleet oiler in Australia after the start of World War II, he answered a request for duty watchstanders with the Melbourne Australia Fleet Radio Unit. Having a flair for languages having learned five, he answered that request not knowing that it was the decoding group that was monitoring the Japanese Fleet message traffic. Training himself in the language beyond what was required, Petty Officer Tremblay completed his required work on 14 May 1942 at 2330, but he saw that a number of low priority message intercepts were incomplete or so garbled that they might never be decoded. On his own initiative he completed the work necessary to recognize that he had the complete Japanese Navy Battle Plan of Attack upon Midway Island. No other location had intercepted the message or could decipher it, including Washington, D.C. By his initiative of doing his job, and then some more, Petty Officer Tremblay provided the U.S. Navy with the enemy plans with which the Navy accomplished one of history’s greatest military victories.

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Admiral Richmond Kelly Turner, 1908-1947 2002 Inductee
Premier Amphibious Commander in the Pacific throughout WWII. Served aboard Milwaukee, Active, Preble, West Virginia. Commanded Stewart and Marietta. During WWI served aboard Pennsylvania, Michigan, and Mississippi. Thereafter, served aboard California and staff Scouting Fleet. Commanded destroyer Mervine and cruiser Astoria. Director War Plans at start of WWII. Commanded all major Central Pacific amphibious landings throughout the war: Guadalcanal, Russell Islands, New Georgia, Rendova, Gilberts, Marshalls, Marianas, Iwo Jima, and Okinawa. As Commander Amphibious Forces Pacific, made all plans for the invasion of Japan when the war ended.

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Captain Cassin Young, 1916-1942 2009 Inductee
Served aboard battleship Connecticut through World War I, and then in submarines. He was Communications Officer aboard battleship New York, commanded destroyer Evans and later was the Commanding Officer of auxiliary Vestal moored outboard of Arizona at Pearl Harbor. During the attack, he took personal charge of an anti-aircraft gun until the Arizona blast blew him overboard. Swimming back to his ship, and although wounded, he maneuvered his ship clear of Arizona, saving it and earning the Medal of Honor. He was subsequently the Commanding Officer of the cruiser San Francisco and was killed in action off Savo Island on November 13, 1942. During the latter battle, he guided his ship in action with a superior Japanese force and was killed by enemy shells while closely engaging the battleship Hiei. Captain Young was posthumously awarded the Navy Cross for his actions during the campaign and San Francisco received the Presidential Unit Citation.

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Cold War & Beyond 1945-Present

Chief Petty Officer George Ajdukovich, 1969 2006 Inductee
No Image On 7 October 1969, with a two river patrol boat station on the Muo Hai Canal in Vietnam, an enemy grenade landed on his craft. He immediately seized the grenade, clasping it to his body in an attempt to protect his crewmen. When it failed to detonate, he cast it into the water, where it did explode. During the subsequent heavy weapons firefight, he extricated his patrol, and illuminated and mortared the hostile area until air attacks could be made on the entrenched enemy. He was awarded the Navy Cross.

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Seaman Timothy D. Alspaugh, USN 1969 Year
No Image On 25 September 1969 he was the after fifty-caliber machine gunner aboard River patrol boat 677, River Division 521, River Patrol Flotilla FIVE, Task Force 116(TF-116) which was inserted in a night waterborne guard post on the north bank of the Cai Lon river in support of interdiction operations in Kien Giang Province. His boat was acting as the cover boat and had taken a position about fifty yards astern of the patrol’s lead boat, with its starboard side to a heavy growth of nipa palm along the river bank. Several hours later he observed what he believed to be a sampan on the river upstream from his boat. Alerting his Boat Captain and bring his machine gun to bear over the port quarter, he was concentrating on the craft when he was struck on his left side by a grenade thrown from the underbrush. He immediately warned his crewmembers, at the same time bending down to search for the grenade, which had come to rest on the pump covers on the far side of his gun mount. He located the grenade and threw it back into the small clearing from which it had been thrown. Even before the grenade exploded near the enemy’s position, he was firing his gun into the brush, continuing until the boats were clear of the area. He was awarded the Navy Cross.

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Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Delbert D. Black, 1941-1971 2002 Inductee
Served as the Navy’s first Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON) from January 13, 1967 to April 1, 1971. A Pearl Harbor survivor aboard battleship Maryland, he earned eight combat ribbons in WW II, served a tour in recruiting, and with the Ceremonial Guard in Washington, D.C. His task was to create the position of MCPON by establishing credibility, faithfully representing the enlisted Sailor, fully supporting the chain of command, and inspiring a Navy in need of role models. With a staff of one, he accomplished each of those things by the end of his tour. From then on, MCPONs have often been called upon to provide testimony to Congress on enlisted issues. He firmly established the office of the Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy as one of dignity and respect, demonstrated that enlisted Sailors were capable of significant advise and responsibility. He was a trusted advisor to the Chief of Naval Operations and an integral part of the Chain of Command.

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Seaman James L. Blaskis, USN 2015 Inductee
Seaman James L Blaskis, USN, was awarded the Navy and Marine Corps Medal (Posthumously) for heroism on 29 July 1967, while serving aboard USS Forrestal (CVA-59) in the Gulf of Tonkin. Seaman Blaskis was manning the port steering unit in the extreme port quarter of Forrestal when fire broke out on the flight deck causing severe ship threatening explosions and fire spread throughout the after end of the ship. One of the initial explosions hurled shrapnel in to the port compartment, killing one man and seriously wounding Seaman Blaskis and a fellow shipmate. Despite his wounds, and the knowledge that help was unable to reach him Seaman Blaskis remained at his station controlling the steering mechanism and administering first aid to his shipmate until he succumbed to his own wounds. For his courage and devotion to duty he was awarded The Navy and Marine Corp Medal

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Master Chief Boatswain's Carl Brashear, USN 1948-1979 2004 Inductee
Despite losing his left leg in an accident, Master Chief Brashear advanced from E-1 to E-9 to become the first African-American Master Diver in the U.S. Navy. Master Chief Brashear served afloat aboard Palau, Tripoli, Opportune, Nereus, Coucal, Shakori, Hoist, Hunley, and Recovery and progressed successively through the Navy's Diving Specialties: Salvage Diver; Second Class Diver; First Class Diver; Saturation Diver; and Master Diver. He was awarded the Navy and Marine Corps Medal, Navy Commendation Medal, Navy Achievement Medal, and eight awards of the Good Conduct Medal. His sterling example inspired a movie about his life (Men of Honor) which depicted the racism he overcame, the heroism he displayed in diving, and the inspiration he exhibited in his leadership.

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Damage Controlman Third Class Petty Officer Nathan Bruckenthal, USCG, 2009 Inductee
He was a leading member of a Coast Guard Law Enforcement Team deployed with Coast Guard Patrol Forces Southwest Asia aboard the USS FIREBOLT in the Spring of 2004. On 24 April 2004, the first day of patrols inside the territorial waters of Iraq following an extended training and repair period, FIREBOLT was tasked with maintaining an established exclusion zone around the Kwahr al Amaya Oil Terminal by querying vessels and approaching as necessary to direct them clear. Upon arrival in their assigned station, over 15 unknown vessels were operating inside the exclusion zone with the majority of vessels appearing to be common fishing dhows. Petty Officer Bruckenthal was the team leader and only U.S. Coast Guard member of a seven-Sailor security team that boarded the ship's Rigid-Hull Inflatable Boat in the afternoon of 24 April 2004 to clear vessels from the exclusion zone. Within the first hour of operations, the security team successfully cleared over 10 unauthorized vessels from the areas closest to the oil terminal and was beginning to expand the operation into the outer areas of the exclusion zone. An unidentified dhow was detected by the boarding team traveling along a course that would take it in close to the oil terminal and the RHIB was maneuvered to query and intercept. At intercept, the dhow did not answer bridge-to-bridge queries, was unresponsive to loud-hailer directions, and maintained a direct course for the terminal. Some security team members would later report that the helmsman, the only person visible on the vessel, appeared nervous and was gesturing toward the oil terminal. The RHIB circled the dhow to reposition to screen the terminal and get closer for loud-hailer effectiveness. Abruptly, the dhow altered course toward the FIREBOLT RHIB and exploded at close range, violently throwing the security team into the water and overturning the RHIB. Petty Officer Bruckenthal was closest to the blast directing the RHIB's maneuvers when he was thrown into the water from the blast. Soon after the explosion alongside the FIREBOLT RHIB, two other explosives-laden vessels attempted to close the nearby Al Basra Oil Terminal but were disabled by crew-served weapons fire from the alerted security forces on the terminals. Petty Officer Bruckenthal was pulled from the water by rescue teams from FIREBOLT and the Australian Frigate HMAS Stuart and was evacuated to Kuwait Hospital where he later died of his wounds. The actions of Petty Officer Bruckenthal and his security team on 24 April 2004 prevented a large scale environmental disaster and a strategic blow to the coalition forces that would have been caused by damage to the oil pipeline or destruction of the offshore oil terminals.

Petty Officer Bruckenthal was the first Coast Guardsman killed in action since the Vietnam War.

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Seaman Mark R. Caouette, USN 2016 Inductee
For heroism while serving in USS STARK (FFG-31) on 17 May 1987. When the ship was struck by two Iraqi air-to-surface missiles, Seaman Caouette courageously and unhesitatingly continued to set material condition Zebra despite severe burns, shrapnel wounds, and the loss of one leg. His actions out of concern for his ship and shipmates were without regard for his own personal safety. He selflessly gave his life in the line of duty so that others might live, eventually succumbing to fire. Seaman Caouette’s brave actions and loyal devotion to duty in the face of great personal risk, saved the lives of his shipmates; thereby reflecting great credit upon himself and upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Awarded the Purple Heart posthumously.

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Engineman First Class Milton W. Confer, USN 1970 Year
No Image On 13 February 1970 he was an advisor to the Patrol Officer in charge of two Vietnamese River patrol boats, escorting a re-supply mission. The column included two heavy logistics craft loaded with seven tons of ammunition and a fuel barge with eight thousand gallons of fuel. Enemy fire erupted with his patrol boat situated between the heaviest enemy firing positions and the transports. He attempted to man the aft fifty-caliber machine gun but was knocked to the deck as the first of several rockets hit the boat. He then manned the midship’s gun and fired suppressive volleys into the enemy positions until his ammunition was exploded. He again attempted to man the aft gun and was hit by an enemy bullet. He succeeded in firing the gun until he was obliged to direct his boat alongside one of the logistics craft to rearm. While rearming, his boat received numerous heavy machine gun hits which damaged both engines and started a fire. Despite being wounded he began another firing run on the heaviest of the enemy positions as the boats finally neared the end of the kill zone. Only when he was relieved by units scrambled to aid his convoy did he attend to his wound. He was awarded the Navy Cross.

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Vice Admiral James Doyle, Sr. 2005 Inductee
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Vice Admiral James Doyle, Jr., 1946-1980 2010 Inductee
As a junior officer he served aboard the cruiser Chicago and destroyer John W. Thomason, minesweeper Bulwark and commanded minecraft Ruff and Redstart. After a tour with JAG, he served as Executive Officer of destroyer leader John S. McCain and Commanding Officer of destroyer John R. Craig. After training in nuclear power, he was executive officer of cruiser Newport News and Commanding Officer of nuclear cruiser Bainbridge, for which he earned two Legion of Merit Medals and the Bronze Star Medal. As a flag officer, Admiral Doyle was Chief, International Negotiations Division, Joint Chiefs of Staff, involved in SALT 1 and Incidents at Sea negotiations with the Soviet Union, and represented the Joint Chiefs of Staff on the U. S. Delegation to the Law of the Sea Conference. He then commanded Cruiser-Destroyer Group TWELVE and deployed to the Sixth Fleet as Commander Attack Carrier Striking Group TWO embarked in USS Forrestal (CV 59). His last sea assignment was Commander Third Fleet from 1974 to 1975. From 1975 to 1980, he was Deputy Chief of Naval Operations, Surface Warfare, OP-03, with responsibility for the Navy’s shipbuilding and surface warfare programs, including surface warfare education and training. Specifically, he sponsored the development, construction and introduction of the Aegis fleet of cruisers and destroyers (CG-47 class and DDG-51 class) and their associated combat systems. His responsibility also included a number of ongoing surface warfare programs-TOMAHAWK, Vertical Launch System, HARPOON, LAMPS, SQR-19 Towed Array, SQS-23 Sonar, MK-46 Torpedo, AEGIS Weapon System, New Threat Upgrade, STANDARD Missile, CIWS, RAM, NATO SEASPARROW, SLQ-32, Battle Group AAW, and Gas Turbine propulsion.

Admiral Doyle was twice awarded the Distinguished Service Medal first in international negotiations and then in surface warfare. After retiring in 1980, he served as Vice Chairman of the Strike and Air Defense Division of the National Defense Industrial Association until 2007. He has been an adviser to the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory, the Naval War College, and the Center for Oceans Law and Policy, University of Virginia. From 1982 to 1989, he taught International Law of the Sea at the National Law Center, George Washington University.

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Boatswain’s Mate First Class Carroll E. Dutterer, Jr, USN 1967 2012 Inductee
No Image On 15 September 1967 in the Mekong Delta region of the Republic of Vietnam he was Boat Captain of Armored Troop Carrier 111-6, a unit of River Assault Division 11, river Assault Squadron 11, river Assault Flotilla ONE, Task Force 1179TF-117), operating in support o the Second Brigade, Ninth United States Army Infantry division. He participated in a mobile riverine assault operation against a Viet Cong stronghold in Cam Son Secret Zone. While proceeding in formation with embarked Army troops, the riverine assault units came under intense automatic-weapons, recoilless-rifle, and rocket fire from enemy positions of both banks of the narrow stream. His boat was one of the lead units in the formation, and was returning maximum fire when it was hit simultaneously by two enemy rockets, wounding him and four other crewmen, and destroying all communications equipment. Unable to receive instructions by radio, or to observe movements of the other craft through the dense smoke, he was unaware that other units had been ordered to reverse course and retire to a safe area for casualty evacuation. Determined to carry out his assigned mission, he fought his craft, alone and with no fire support, through the entire 1800-meter enemy barrage, and landed his troops. When the troops were pinned down by enemy fire, he directed fire from his exposed position topside and re-beached his boat to pick up the troops. During the re-embarkation, he was seriously wounded when his boat was hit again by an enemy rocket. Despite his wounds he maintained control of his craft until re-embarkation was completed. He was awarded a Navy Cross.

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Engineman Second Class Joseph J. Ennis, USN 1968 2011 Inductee
On 4 April 1968 while serving in Vietnam as Boat Engineer and 30-caliber gunner, Petty Officer Ennis was aboard Armored Troop Carrier (ATC 92-2). River Assault Division 92, River Assault Squadron 9, Task Force 117 (TF-117), during strike operations in support of US Army units along the Song Ba Lai River in the Mekong Delta region. When the Viet Cong launched an attack on the entire column of boats with rockets, recoilless rifles, automatic weapons, and small arms, Petty Officer Ennis immediately returned fire with his machine gun which was mounted in the well-deck forward. Seconds later, a rocket exploded on the canopy directly overhead, knocking him down and severely wounding him. Although stunned and in great pain, he returned to his weapon, only to find the gun inoperable. After making his way aft to the boat’s magazine to obtain another machine gun, he returned to the forward well deck and immediately fired the weapon from a hand-held position against the enemy until his ammunition was exhausted. He then began administering first aid to the wounded personnel in the well deck. As the boat neared the bank, he quickly reloaded his weapon, stood on the ramp fully exposed to the enemy fire, and put down a withering base of cover fire for the assault troops, maintaining his position until every able-bodied soldier had gotten ashore and had reached a relatively safe position in the tree line. After an hour of fierce combat, ATC 92-2 cleared the area. He continued to assist in treating and moving wounded until all had been removed to the aid boat. Only then, nearing collapse from loss of blood, did he proceed to the medical aid boat for treatment of his severe wounds. He was awarded the Navy Cross.

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Lieutenant William Charles Fitzgerald, USN 1956-1967 2011 Inductee
At about 0300 on 7 August 1967, Costal Group Sixteen's compound came under vicious attack by two Viet Cong battalions. The assault began with an intense mortar barrage followed immediately by the advance of troops. Fitzgerald, the senior American commander, immediately ordered a retreat of the civilians within the compound. Because of the compound's location adjacent to a river and the aggressor’s position, the only escape route was via water in small boats. Lieutenant Fitzgerald and three others delayed their retreat as long as possible in order to provide covering fire and to direct fire from surrounding friendly forces. Many calls were made to orbiting gunship aircraft, artillery units, and "Swift"-type fast river patrol boats to provide defensive fire. The Viet Cong attack however, was swift and well coordinated. It soon became apparent that the South Vietnamese forces were decimated and that the American bunker was the sole remaining source of resistance. As the situation deteriorated, Fitzgerald ordered his last three remaining defenders to retreat while he used arms fire to cover their escape. Fitzgerald was mortally wounded in this action. In honor of Lieutenant William C. Fitzgerald's loyal and selfless dedication to his people, he was posthumously awarded the U. S. Navy's highest decoration for valour The Navy Cross. Additionally, USS FITZGERALD DDG 62 is named after him. He was also awarded the Purple Heart, National Defense Service Medal, Vietnam Service Medal, and the Republic of Vietnam Campaign ribbon bar.

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SHMC Kevin Ford, USN 2004 Inductee
On the evening of 14 April 1988, while conducting operations in the Persian Gulf in support of Operation Ernest Will, USS Samuel B. Roberts FFG 58 struck an Iranian MO-8 mine causing catastrophic damage to the ship structure and extensive fires in the engineering spaces and superstructure. With the ship on fire and sinking rapidly from massive flooding SHMC Ford lead a damage control team into a severely damaged engineering space (AMR2) that was actively flooding and in need of immediate effort to save the ship from sinking (Since two main engineering spaces had already totally flooded). Ford lead his team fearlessly despite working in water already at or above waist level and with the certain knowledge that the damaged bulkheads that were already fractured and leaking massive amounts of water could collapse at any minute drowning all team members in seconds. Undaunted Ford directed his repair team expertly, patching, plugging, shoring and dewatering the space until it was saved and the ships buoyancy maintained. After setting a dewatering watch Chief Ford lead his team to join other damage control teams fighting fires in the superstructure of the ship. Despite the fact that temperatures were high enough to melt the soles of the shoes of the firefighters Ford lead an attack team that was instrumental in extinguishing upper level fires adjacent to the 76MM gun magazine that seriously endangered the survival of the ship. Chief Ford's performance was significantly instrumental in the saving of Samuel B. Roberts and was awarded the Bronze star for his heroic actions.

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Gunner’s Mate Second Class Patrick Osborne Ford, USN 1959-1963 1965-1968 2011 Inductee
Enlisted in the Navy after high school and served until 1963. Reenlisted in 1965 and was sent to Naval Amphibious Base, Coronado, California for River Patrol Craft Training. Following completion of training in 1968, GMG2 Ford was directed to report to the Naval Support Activity, Saigon, Republic of Vietnam. He was assigned to Task Force 116, River Squadron 5, River Section 535 in 1968. For the next five months, he served as a patrol river boat sailor, monitoring the traffic of the many rivers and coastal waterways of the area. On 21 June 1968, GMG2 Ford was serving as the after machine-gunner aboard Patrol River Boat 750 as part of a two-boat patrol operating in the upper My Tho River near the town of Cai Be. The boats were maneuvering down the river when they spotted a sampan fleeing into a nearby canal. The two patrol boats gave chase and captured the sampan one hundred meters further up the canal. As the patrol boat returned to the river with the captured sampan in tow, it was ambushed by a Viet Cong patrol that unleashed an overwhelming barrage of heavy machine-gunfire and rockets. Two explosive B-40 rockets struck Ford's boat, immediately killing the patrol leader and coxswain. Within seconds, the boat was ablaze and out of control, heading directly for the Viet Cong positions. Even as the boat was hit by four additional rockets, and after suffering serious injuries, Ford tenaciously maintained a steady volume of return fire from his aft machine-gunner's station. In the face of enemy gunfire and with his clothing on fire, Ford assisted three seriously wounded shipmates into the water. Only after ensuring that all the surviving crew had left the boat did Ford make his way into the water. He was the last man alive to leave what remained of Patrol River Boat 750. Soon after GMG2 Ford entered the water, he was killed by a burst of enemy machine-gun fire. However, as a result of his fearless devotion to duty, he saved the lives of two of his shipmates. He was posthumously awarded the Navy Cross. The USS FORD FFG 54 was commissioned in his honor.

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Radarman Second Class Terrence Jay Freund, USN 1966 2013 Inductee
No Image On 26 October 1966 serving with US River patrol Force near An Lac Thon Village, Republic of Vietnam. As forward machine gunner on board River patrol boat FORTY (PBR-40), River Section 511, river Squadron FIVE, Task Force 116 (TF-116), during a combat patrol on the Bassac River, he was instrumental in preventing an enemy battalion from crossing the river, and assisted in the dispersal of that force. By determined and accurate gunfire, he repeatedly suppressed enemy fire from the river banks during the hotly contested action. When an attempt to capture an enemy craft resulted in the recovery party being forced into the river by hostile fire, Freund’s covering fire was instrumental in their rescue. Although mortally wounded, he continued to fire into enemy positions so that his craft and other friendly forces could be extricated from their perilous positions close to the enemy. He enabled his unit to retire from the action without further loss of life or damage. He was awarded a Navy Cross posthumously.

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Boiler Technician First Class Andrew T. Gallagher, USN 2015 Inductee
On November 1975 while conducting night flight operations east of Sicily, the USS Belknap (CG 26) and the USS John F. Kennedy (CV 67) collided, Belknap sustained major damage and a fire that raged for more than 2 hours before being brought under control. At the time of the collision, BT2 Gallagher and the members of his watch team remained behind despite heavy smoke and flames in the fire room. Then disregarding their own personal safety they secured the fuel oil closing valves, the fuel oil service pumps and other key propulsion machinery. The result of this action was to decisively prevent ship’s fuel oil from feeding the raging fire which had started in the mid-ships section of the ship coincident with the collision. After ensuring that the supply of fuel to his fire room was secured, BT2 Gallagher notified main control of the necessity to evacuate the fire room and his intention to do so. He then directed each member of his watch section to safety, and only left the space when he was sure all others had departed the severely burning area before him. He further led his men through flames on the main deck area to safety on the forecastle. During his efforts BT2 Gallagher sustained first and second degree burns over approximately seventy-five percent of his body, and smoke inhalation. As a result of his actions, potential fatal additional damage to the burning ship and numerous additional casualties were prevented, and the lives of his watch team saved. For his courage and devotion to duty he was awarded the Legion of Merit.

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Engineman Third Class Michael L. Gates, USN 1969 2013 Inductee
No Image On 10 July 1969 he was boat Engineer of a River patrol boat, with River Division 533, River Squadron FIVE, Task Force 116(TF-116), which was patrolling the upper reaches of the Vam Co Dong River in a special holding operation to protect Tay Ninh city from expected heavy enemy attack. While settling into waterborne guard-post positions, the units came under heavy automatic-weapons fire. During the first volley, he fell to the deck with a serious bullet wound which temporarily paralyzed the lower half of this body. When the units cleared the ambush only to come under a second enemy attack, he despite his wound, grabbed a grenade launcher and, from his prone position on the deck of the boat, returned the enemy’s fire until the boats again cleared the ambush. After he was transported to the flight deck of a troop carrier to await medical evacuation by helicopter, the enemy once more ambushed the boats. Lying on his back completely exposed to the enemy fire, he manned an M-16 rifle which he had requested, and proceeded to assist his shipmates in suppressing the enemy fire. He was award the Navy Cross.

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NameChief Boatswain's Mate Donald B. Groce, USN 2015 Inductee
Served as Advisor to Vietnamese Navy Zippo Boat (HG-6533). On 4 September 1970 Chief Boatswain mate Groce’s Zippo boat was ambushed by Viet Cong sappers in the “Can To” tributary to the Mekong River, Republic of Vietnam. In the early moments of the engagement the Zippo suffered heavy casualties and a rocket hit in the vicinity of CPO Groce wounding him in the arms and legs as well as knocking him out of the coxswain’s flat and into the main deck gunwale. Despite his wounds CPO Groce made his way back to his battle station and resumed his advisory duties while assisting the Vietnamese Boat Captain in the counterattack. Chief Boatswain Groce was then hit again with shrapnel from a second enemy rocket causing a deep hip wound and a compound fracture of his right thumb. Despite these wounds he crawled forward on the open deck to the boat’s flamethrower mounts that were not firing. While exposing himself to the full force of enemy fire, he calmly aligned the flame system and shouted encouragement to the other crewmembers to retake their positions. He personally operated one flame mount and supervised the employment of the flamethrowers against the enemy’s positions until enemy fire was suppressed. For his courage and determination while severely wounded he received the Navy Cross. During his career, Senior Chief Boatswain's Mate Donald B. Groce receives an additional three bronze stars with combat "V" and 5 Purple Hearts.

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Fireman William E Hayenga, Jr., USN (R) 1968 2013 Inductee
No Image On 4 February 1968 serving with River Section 535, River Assault Squadron FIVE, Task Force 116(TF-116). During Operation BOLD DRAGON I, he participated in a four-PBR combat patrol on the Rach Hong Nhu River to assist a Vietnamese unit pinned down by a Viet Cong company. When BPR 728 was hit by three rockets and forced to beach in the middle of the ambush site, PBR 731, having also taken a direct rocket hit, returned to the stricken boat to attempt rescue of its crew. One crew member was rescued shortly after beaching. Realizing the gravity of the situation, Hayenga volunteered to search for the four missing crew members. Unarmed, he jumped ashore and made his way upstream toward the partially-sunken boat. Finding no one on the boat, he continued his search among the numerous thatched hutches along the river bank and located two of the crew hidden in a drainage ditch. One was wounded, he assisted the wounded man and led them all back to PBR 731. Enemy fire was so effective at one point that the men were forced to crawl approximately thirty yards across an open space. On the other side of the clearing Hayenga found a third crew member who was the Boat Commander of PBR 728, Hayenga then also guided him to safety and eventual rescue. Hayenga was awarded the Navy Cross.

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Captain Thomas G. Kelley, 1960-1990 2001 Inductee
Assigned to Pandemus, Davis, Destroyer Development Group TWO, and Stickell before joining Riverine Task Force 117 in 1968 during the Vietnam War. He was awarded the Medal of Honor for action in Vietnam on 15 June 1969 while serving as Commander River Assault Division 152 and in charge of a column of eight river assault craft which were extracting a company of U.S. Army infantry troops in Kien Hoa Province. When one of the armored troop carriers reported a mechanical failure of a loading ramp, enemy forces opened fire from the opposite bank of the canal. After issuing orders for the crippled troop carrier to raise its ramp manually, and for the remaining boats to form a protective cordon around the disable craft, then LCDR Kelley boldly maneuvered the monitor in which he was embarked to the exposed side of the protective cordon in line with the enemy’s fire, and directed return fire. An enemy rocket scored a direct hit on the area where LCDR Kelley was located spraying shrapnel that caused him serious head wounds. Disregarding his severe injuries, he continue to direct the other boats. Although unable to move from the deck or to speak clearly into the radio, he succeeded in relaying his commands through one of his men until the enemy attack was silenced and all boats were able to move to an area of safety. Captain Kelley subsequently served as Executive Officer of Sample, Commanding Officer of Lang, Commander Military Sealift Command Far East, and Chief of Staff USN Forces Korea, with shore tours at CINCPACFLT, OPNAV, and BUPERS.

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Senior Chief Hospital Corpsman (SW/FMF) Doreen E. Lehner, USN (Ret) 1987-2012 2017 Inductee
While serving as the Senior Medical Department Representative in USS PORT ROYAL (CG 73) deployed to the North Arabian Gulf, HMCS (SW/FMF) Lehner displayed heroism above and beyond the call of duty. On May 26, 2006 Senior Chief Lehner was preparing her medical team to care for impending mass casualties from a major fire on one of the large Iraqi oil terminals. After providing assistance to the damage control team, she was directed to depart as a major explosion was anticipated. As she began to depart, a “Man Down call” caught her attention. Braving a major conflagration, she and her team placed themselves in imminent danger to aide and resuscitate an injured Iraqi worker. She provided urgent lifesaving care in the face of imminent explosions and promptly supervised the evacuation of the injured civilian past raging 50-foot high flames, sagging steel beams, and billowing smoke. By her heroic and prompt actions in the face of great personal risk, Senior Chief Lehner prevented the loss of life by risking her own, thereby reflecting great credit upon herself and upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. She was awarded the Navy and Marine Corps Medal for heroism while serving on board USS PORT ROYAL.

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Vice Admiral William P. Mack, 1937-1975 2007 Inductee
He served in World War II, Korea, and Vietnam wars aboard USS Idaho, USS John D. Ford, USS Preston, and commanded USS Woodworth, USS Anderson, DESDIV 22, DESRON 28, and PHIBGRU 2. As Commander Seventh Fleet he was responsible for the successful mining of Haiphong Harbor in the Vietnam War. Staff assignments included Amphibious Force Pacific, DESFLOT 1, CRUDESPAC, offices of the CNO, SECNAV, and SECDEF. His final tour was as Superintendent of the Naval Academy where he helped break down barriers to admission with respect to race and gender. He earned the Silver Star Medal, Bronze Star Medal, and Navy Distinguished Service Medal. VADM Mack also authored over 13 books, including standards in the Navy: “Command at Sea”; “Naval Ceremonies, Customs and Traditions”; and the “Naval Officer’s Guide”. Vice Admiral William P. Mack, an officer of diverse talents and abilities, served his country with distinction over five decades and three wars.

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Captain William L. McGonagle, 1944-1974 2006 Inductee
Enlisting in the Navy in January 1944, he was subsequently assigned to the NROTC program and commissioned in 1947. He served aboard destroyer Frank Knox, and during the Korean War, minesweepers Partridge and Kite. He participated in sweeping World War II mines from Baltic and North Seas. After service aboard cruiser Rochester, he commanded fleet tug Mataco, fleet rescue ship Reclaimer, and technical research ship Liberty. As commanding officer of Liberty (AGTR-5), he was sailing in international waters when attacked without warning by Israeli jet fighter aircraft and motor torpedo boats which inflicted significant casualties among the crew and caused extreme damage to the ship. Although severely wounded during the first air attack, Captain McGonagle remained at his battle station steadfastly refusing any treatment and calmly continued to exercise firm command of his ship, directing it’s defense, supervising the damage effort and seeing to the care of casualties. Despite wounds and loss of blood, he remained at his bridge station for seventeen hours, and earned the Medal of Honor. He subsequently became Commanding Officer (commissioning) of ammunition ship Kilauea and NROTC at University of Oklahoma. His final assignment was at Joint U.S. Military Assistance, Philippines.

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LCDR John N. McKay, USN 2015 Inductee
On November 1975 while conducting night flight operations east of Sicily, the USS Belknap (CG 26) and the USS John F. Kennedy (CV 67) collided, Belknap sustained major damage and a fire that raged for more than 2 hours before being brought under control. At the first sound of the collision, LCDR McKay, Belknap’s Chief Engineer, without regard for personal safety, left the wardroom and went directly to Damage Control central to assess the damage. He then proceeded to main control despite heavy blinding smoke and supervised the securing of the engineering spaces to minimize damage, loss of life and casualties. Following an explosion in the after fire room, he succeeded in having emergency power quickly brought on the line to assist the ongoing Damage Control, Firefighting and Rescue efforts. When the emergency gas turbine failed, he successfully brought it back online by ingeniously contriving an emergency coolant water system using a P-250 pump to keep the engine within operational parameters. He continuously insured the functioning of each of the ship’s five fire pumps, keeping them on the line as long as possible. Lcdr. McKay repeatedly traversed the ship below decks, despite acrid smoke and numerous explosions of 3 inch ammunition, searching for injured crew members and leading them to safety. He capably acted as a human communications link while directing the organization of fire parties and movement of equipment to the various fires amidships. When a starboard list developed, he investigated and determined water trapped in the wardroom pantry to be a significant contributing cause, and immediately directed that holes be cut in the bulkhead to drain the water and correct the list. His persistent display of bravery in the face of great danger to his own life inspired those around him. His courageous, tireless and brilliant supervision of the damage control effort, unquestionably, contributed to the saving of many lives as well as saving the ship. For his courage and devotion to duty he was awarded the Navy and Marine Corps Medal.

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Vice Admiral Joseph Metcalf, III 1946-1988 2008 Inductee
Served aboard destroyer Watts, staff Commander Cruiser Division Six, before commanding landing ships King County and Westchester County. Commanded destroyer escort Bradley, Destroyer Squadron 33, Naval Surface Group, Middle Pacific; Cruiser-Destroyer Group Eight; and Second Fleet. His shore assignments included BUPERS and Office of the CNO in Total Force Management, Director of the Navy Program Information Center, and Deputy CNO for Surface Warfare. Pursued surface warrior excellence as incorporated in the surface warfare symbol of Up, Out, and Down. Awards included three Distinguished Service Medals, three Legion of Merits, two Bronze Star Medals with Combat “V”. For many years, he was an active leader in the Surface Navy Association.

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Rear Admiral Wayne E. Meyer, 1943-1985 2010 Inductee
Admiral Meyer began his career in 1943 as an apprentice seaman. He was commissioned Ensign, U.S. Naval Reserve, in 1946 and was transferred to Regular Navy in 1948. He attended the Joint Guided Missile School in Fort Bliss, Texas, the Naval Line School in Monterey, California, eventually serving as an instructor at the Special (atomic) Weapons School, Norfolk, Virginia. He returned to sea as Executive Officer in STRICKLAND (DER-333), followed by service on the Staff, Commander, Destroyer Force, Atlantic. He was then ordered to the TALOS cruiser GALVESTON (CLG-3) and from there to the Secretary of the Navy's Special Task Force for Surface Missile Systems in Washington, D.C. He transferred to the Naval Ordnance Engineering Corps in 1966. In 1967, he reported as Director of Engineering at the Naval Ship Missile Systems Engineering Station, Port Hueneme, California and three years later to the Naval Ordnance Systems Command, as Manager, AEGIS Weapons System. He was named Project Manager for Surface Missile Systems in 1972 and in July 1974, he was named the first Director of Surface Warfare, Naval Sea Systems Command. He was selected for Admiral in January 1975. In July 1975, he assumed duties as the founding Project Manager, AEGIS Shipbuilding. In September 1983, he was reassigned as Deputy Commander, Weapons and Combat Systems, Naval Sea Systems Command. He has been called “Father of AEGIS”. He helped to revolutionize the Navy from rotating radars in antiaircraft gunnery to the use of the Navy’s first 360 degree track system for missile employment. He managed all efforts to automate and integrate detection, tracking, classifying, and launching anti air missiles against enemy missiles through the development of the SPY-1 phased array radar, the MK 1 Command and Decision System, and the SM-2 missile. For the first fifteen years of the Navy’s surface to air missile effort, he pioneered and lead the surface Navy’s missile weapons system development and ensured total ship integration with the first AEGIS cruiser (Ticonderoga) and first AEGIS destroyer (Arleigh Burke), working at the Naval Ship Missile Systems Engineering Station Port Hueneme, as Director of Surface Warfare at NAVESEASSYSCOM, and finally as Deputy Commander for Weapons and Systems at NAVSEASYSCOM. Meyer's philosophy of "Build a Little, Test a Little, Learn a Lot" is still used in today’s ongoing testing in the BMD arena. Awarded the Navy Distinguished Service Medal.

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Lieutenant Harold Dale Meyerkord, USN(R) 1960-1965 2012 Inductee
He received his commission through Officer Candidate School, served in USS LOS ANGELES (CA-135) and USS DUNCAN (DDR-874), and arrived in Vietnam for duty with the Naval Advisory Group on 13 July 1964. After arrival he made a habit of flying low-level recon with Army helo units in order to improve his knowledge of the canals and rivers in his operating area. He served with the Naval Advisory Group, United States Military Assistance Command, Republic of Vietnam, and was assigned as Naval Advisor to the River Force of the Vietnamese Navy. He was directly involved in more than thirty combat operations against enemy aggressor forces, Lieutenant Meyerkord at all times served to inspire all who observed him by his superb leadership and cool courage while under enemy fire. On 30 November 1964, he was instrumental in turning defeat into victory when, under fire, he reconnoitered ahead of friendly forces and discovered that river craft could proceed no farther because of a Viet Cong canal block. He immediately proceeded to set up a shore command post, direct artillery fire, call for medical evacuation helicopters, and call for and direct air strikes. On 13 January 1965, he transferred from a command boat to a small boat, and preceded to a boat grounded in Viet Cong territory, administered first aid to the wounded, and returned to the command boat, all of which took place while he was exposed to constant enemy fire. On 24 January 1965, he assumed direction of a Vietnamese River Force flotilla when the Vietnamese Commander was wounded in an ambush. Later in the action, although wounded himself and facing heavy fire, he continued the fight for almost an hour, until victory was assured. In his final action, on 16 March 1965, Lieutenant Meyerkord lost his life while leading a river sortie into insurgent territory after he had again positioned himself in the leading boat in order to direct operations and set an example for the Vietnamese Naval personnel. Caught in a heavy ambush in which he was wounded by the first fusillade from the Viet Cong, he was reported to have returned their fire at pointblank range until he was again wounded, this time mortally. By his sustained leadership, initiative, and courage throughout these operations he was awarded the Navy Cross. Later, USS Meyerkord FF1058 was commissioned in his honor.

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Vice Admiral Henry (Hank) Mustin, USN (Ret) 1955-1989 2017 Inductee
Admiral Hank Mustin, a destroyerman, served at sea in the Pacific and Atlantic Fleets in USS DUNCAN (DDR 874); as Commanding Officer in USS BUNTING (MHC 45), as a plank owner in both USS LAWRENCE (DDG 4) and USS CONYGHAM (DDG 17); as Commanding Officer in USS HENRY B. WILSON (DDG 7); as Commander, Destroyer Squadron 12, home ported in Athens, Greece; as Commander, Cruiser Destroyer Group 2; and as Commander, US Second Fleet and NATO Striking Fleet Atlantic. While in command of Second Fleet, with the cold war at its zenith, then Secretary of the Navy John Lehman, gave Admiral Mustin an order to put teeth into the Maritime Strategy, a plan the Admiral had helped develop. The rules of engagement (ROE) at the time required Commanders to absorb the first shot if hostilities broke out. With new Fighting Instructions the ROE was soon changed: No unit in this fleet will ever take the first SALVO. Admiral Mustin then devised the Fiord tactic which was to operate the fleet in the Norwegian fiords where, undetected and protected from long range air attack, ships were positioned to hit the Soviets in their bastions on the Kola Peninsula. The strategy worked and agitated the Soviets. Secretary Lehman has stated that Admiral Mustin played an amazing and audacious role in winning the cold war at sea in the Fiords and storms of Norway. His final message as Commander Second Fleet ended as follows: “Shoot more. Talk less. God bless, Mustin sends”. This we came to expect: Clear Concise and Courageous. A hallmark of Hank Mustin. He served ashore in Vietnam with the Delta River Patrol Group; as Flag Lieutenant to the Commander-in-Chief Pacific; as Executive Assistant to the Commander-in-Chief US Naval Forces Europe; as Director, Surface Combat Systems Division in the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations; as Deputy Commander Naval Surface Force, Atlantic Fleet; as Naval Inspector General; and as Deputy Chief of Naval Operations (Plans, Policy and Operations). He was responsible for the development of requirements and fleet introduction of the TOMAHAWK missile, the STANDARD missile (SM-2), LAMPS helicopters, and the TICONDEROGA-class AEGIS cruisers. He was instrumental in defining the initial requirements for the ARLEIGH BURKE class destroyers. Vice Admiral Mustin directed all US Navy arms control planning, including the START negotiations with the Soviet Union. He led high level US interagency delegations to Moscow, London, Paris, Lisbon, Oslo and Seoul. He also served as the Senior US Military Representative to the United Nations. His decorations include two Distinguished Service Medals, three Legions of Merit, three Bronze Stars with Combat “V,” Meritorious Service Medal, Combat “V,” Joint Service Commendation Medal, Navy Commendation Medal With Combat “V,” Navy Achievement Medal, Combat Action Ribbon, Presidential Unit Citation, two Navy Unit Commendations, three Meritorious Unit Commendations, many campaign and service medals, and numerous foreign decorations and awards, including the Vietnamese Medal of Honor and Gallantry Cross with Palm. The destroyer Mustin is named for his family’s remarkable legacy of service to the United States Navy and our country.

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Operations Specialist Master Chief Larry Nowell 1958-1977 2005 Inductee
Served afloat aboard destroyer Hamner, guided missile destroyer Mahan, and guided missile cruiser Chicago. Gained early and extensive experience in the Navy’s Tactical Data System (NTDS), qualifying as Air Intercept Controller (AIC) and Supervisor (AICS). Taught NTDS at Fleet Training Centers Dam Neck, VA and Point Loma, CA. While aboard Chicago 1970-74, participated in extensive air intercepts during the Vietnam War. Personally controlled over 100 live engagements for both Navy and Air Force fighter aircraft. Credited with assisting in 13 enemy MIG aircraft kills and with saving 4 friendly F-4 fighters, resulting in the first award of the Distinguished Service Medal in U.S. Navy history to an enlisted man for combat action His knowledge, experience, and teaching ability caused him to attend the Navy Fighter Weapons Tactical School (TOPGUN) and to extensively rewrite the Navy’s curricula for AIC, AICS, NTDS AIC, and NTDS AICS to incorporate aviation and surface techniques.

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Seaman John W. O’Kelley, USN 1968 2011 Inductee
No Image On 26 may 1968 he was assigned to river Assault Division 111, River Assault Squadron ELEVEN, River Assault Flotilla ONE, Task force 117 (TF-117). His craft, Assault Support Patrol boat 111-1 (ASPB-111-1) was engaged in minesweeping operations ahead of a column of River Assault Craft with embarked infantry personnel on the Ong Huong River of Kien Hoa province when reconnaissance-by-fire delivered by ASPB 111-1 triggered a Viet Cong ambush from both sides of the river. Sustaining recoilless-rifle and rocket hits in the first few minutes of the ambush, which killed the Boat Captain and the Coxswain, O’Kelly’s boat went out of control and careened from bank to bank. Realizing the immediate peril to his boat and its surviving crew members, he left his position at a thirty-caliber machine gunner in the stern of the boat and dashed forward under a hail of enemy fire to attempt to bring the boat under control. Driven back by flames, and unable to enter the Coxswain’s flat because casualties inside were blocking the door, he crawled over the top of the boat to the canopy over the coxswain’s flat. After cutting through the heavy canopy in the face of continuing hostile fire, he entered the control are, restarted one of the stalled engines and gained partial steering control. He then brought the boat alongside the Medical aid boat where he rendered assistance to critically wounded personnel and helped remove them for prompt evacuation by helicopter. Had he not taken action instantly to regain control of his boat, the entire column of River Assault Craft could have been trapped in the ambush zone, and suffered heavy casualties and disruption of the entire operation. He was awarded the Navy Cross.

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Seaman David George Ouellet, 1966-1967 2003 Inductee
As the forward machine gunner of River Patrol Boat (PBR) 124 on patrol to the east of My Tho on the Mekong River, Vietnam, on 6 March 1967, Seaman Ouellet alerted his boat captain of suspicious activity near the river bank. As the PBR approached, he saw an incoming enemy grenade. He immediately left the protected position of his gun mount, ran aft the length of the boat, shouting to his fellow crewmembers to take cover. Observing the boat captain standing unprotected, he pushed him to safety. In the split second that followed the grenade’s landing, he fearlessly placed himself between the grenade and his shipmates, absorbing the blast in his body, giving his life for his shipmates.

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BMC Richard H. Patterson, USCG 1966 2007 Inductee
Patterson served on board the Coast Guard cutter Point Welcome when the cutter came under attack by friendly aircraft in August, 1966 just south of the demilitarized zone in South Vietnam. The first attack caused a blazing gasoline fire on the fantail of the cutter that threatened to engulf the entire after section of the vessel. Chief Patterson, displaying the finest qualities of bravery and leadership, took charge of the situation and using a fire hose, forced the flaming liquid over the side, thus extinguishing the fire. Even as he was accomplishing this task, he saw the second aircraft attack rip through the pilot house killing the cutter's commanding officer and seriously wounding the executive officer and the helmsman. Unhesitatingly, and with complete disregard for his personal safety, Chief Patterson climbed to the bridge and took command. He ordered the crew to carry the wounded to the comparative safety of the below decks area. Alone on the bridge, he then maneuvered the cutter at high speed to avoid subsequent attacks. When it became apparent that he could not successfully evade the attacking aircraft, he ran the cutter close ashore, and directed the crew to abandon ship. Under his composed leadership, the wounded were wrapped in life jackets and paired with the able bodied before going over the side. Chief Patterson kept his crew calm and organized while they were in the water and until they were picked up by rescue craft. The Navy Department awarded him the bronze star with the combat "V" device for his actions.

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Boatswain Mate First Class Michael J. Pernaselli 2004 Inductee
BM1 Pernaselli was the leading Boatswain's Mate, a 50 Cal Machine Gun Operator, Quartermaster of the Watch, and Visit, Board, Search and Seizure (VBSS) Team Member in USS FIREBOLT (PC 10) deployed to the Arabian Gulf in the Spring of 2004. On 24 April 2004, the first day of patrols inside the territorial waters of Iraq following an extended training and repair period, FIREBOLT was tasked with maintaining an established exclusion zone around the Khawr al Amaya Oil Terminal by querying vessels and approaching as necessary to direct them clear. An unidentified dhow was detected by the boarding team traveling along a course that would take it in close to the oil terminal and the RHIB was maneuvered to query and intercept. At intercept, the dhow did not answer bridge-to-bridge queries, was unresponsive to loud-hailer directions, and maintained a direct course for the terminal. Abruptly, the dhow altered course toward the FIREBOLT RHIB and exploded at close range, violently throwing the security team into the water and overturning the RHIB. Petty Officer Pernaselli had been all the way forward in the RHIB to observe the actions of the dhow and operator and was killed instantly by the blast. Soon after the explosion alongside the FIREBOLT RHIB, two other explosives-laden vessels attempted to close the nearby Al Basra Oil Terminal but were disabled by crew-served weapons fire from the alerted security forces on the terminals. The actions of Petty Officer Michael Pernaselli and his security team on 24 April 2004 prevented a large scale environmental disaster and a strategic blow to the coalition forces that would have been caused by damage to the oil pipeline or destruction of the offshore oil terminals

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Lieutenant Commander Francis Eugene Rhodes, Jr USN 2016 Inductee
In the face of enemy fire which could have resulted in a devastating defeat by the Viet Cong, Lieutenant Commander Rhodes made a most significant contribution to an operation that resulted in 213 Viet Cong killed in action, 66 probably killed, 600 bunkers destroyed, and a large quantity of war munitions captured. On 15 September 1967 during action against communist insurgent forces in the Mekong Delta, Lieutenant Commander Rhodes was in command of twenty-three riverine assault craft, with United States Army Infantry embarked. While transiting the Rach Ba Rai River during combat riverine strike, search and destroy operations, the entire task group came under heavy Viet Cong fire from fortified bunkers on both banks of the river, sustaining numerous personnel casualties and damage to several boats. Although momentarily stunned when two rockets knocked him and his crew to the deck, Lieutenant Commander Rhodes stationed himself in an exposed position on his command boat and, in the face of heavy, direct enemy fire from close range, he took personal command of all units, and ordered them to regroup and return downstream out of the enemy's fortified area. Hard hit for a second time by a large number of casualties, he nevertheless successfully landed embarked army units ashore in the assigned objective area, and set up a naval blockade of the river. Awarded the Navy Cross and by the Army, a Silver Star for action on the SNog Ny Thu River on 19 June 1967.

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Captain Paul X. Rinn, USN 1968-1998 2009 Inductee
Captain Rinn was the commissioning Commanding Officer of the USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG 58. During first deployment the ship conducted aggressive anti-ship operations against Iranian Surface forces and Iraqi Air forces as well as completing 12 successful "Earnest Will Convoys" as convoy commander. On 14 April 1988 Samuel B. Roberts transits into a mine field in the central Persian Gulf. While attempting to back out down its own wake, the ship struck an Iranian mine sustaining catastrophic damage of sinking, progressive flooding, conflagration fire, loss of propulsion/electric power and personnel injuries. Simultaneously, the Samuel B. Roberts was circled by an Iranian frigate and missile carrying aircraft. Roberts was able to warn off the threats circling the minefield. Commander Rinn led his heroic crew in stopping the progressive flooding, controlling the sinking of the ship and extinguishing the fires. Rinn then evacuated his wounded sailors and navigated his damaged ship out of the mine field, which contained 11 additional mines. At one point the Roberts passed between two submerged mines separated by only a few hundred yards. Eventually the ship was able to transit 24 miles on auxiliary power units to clear the mine danger area saving Samuel B. Roberts without the loss of a single life. The Samuel B. Roberts received a Presidential Unit Citation, Navy Unit Commendation, Meritorious Unit Commendation, Atlantic Fleet Stockdale nominee, U.S. Navy League "Steven Decatur Operational Excellence Award" and was the Squadron Battle E winner. For his action, Commander Rinn was awarded the Legion of Merit with Combat "V". He went on to major command, serving as Commanding Officer, USS Leyte Gulf (CG-55), winning two consecutive Battle E's. While in command, the ship was a Battenberg Cup nominee, and Captain Rinn received the U.S. Navy league "John Paul Jones Inspirational Leadership Award."

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VADM David B. Robinson, 1963-1996 2004 Inductee
Served aboard destroyers Stormes and Rowan; executive officer of cruiser Dale; commanding officer of patrol craft Canon, destroyer Luce, cruiser Richmond K. Turner, and Commander Cruiser Destoyer Group Eight. While commanding Canon during operations in the Vietnam War on 11 August 1970, then LCDR Robinson was awarded the Navy Cross in the Bo De River when his ship came under intense enemy automatic weapons, rocket and small arms attack from a forty-man force on both sides of the river. During the initial hail of enemy fire, LCDR Robinson sustained a broken leg and numerous shrapnel wounds when a rocket exploded on the port side of the bridge. Despite his serious wounds and loss of blood, he continued to direct his ship’s fire until the enemy attack was suppressed. Refusing medical evacuation, LCDR Robinson requested that he be strapped to a stretcher and placed in an upright positions to that he could continue to direct actions of his ship until clear of the enemy ambush site. Shore assignments included BUPERS, Chief of Staff COMNAVSURFLANT, Executive Assistant to VCNO, Director Surface Warfare Manpower and Training; Director Surface Warfare; Director Operational Plans on Joint Staff. His last assignment was Commander, Naval Surface Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet. Additional awards included Defense Distinguished Service Medal, Navy Distinguished Service Medal, Bronze Star Medal, and Meritorious Service Medal.

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SM1 Chester Smith, USN (Ret) 1954-1993 2017 Inductee
Petty Officer Smith displayed extraordinary heroism in action against Communist insurgent forces in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with River Patrol Section 531, River Squadron FIVE, Task Force 116. On 11 December 1966. While assigned as a Patrol Officer on a Patrol Boat conducting combat patrol on the Mekong River, Petty Officer Smith pursued a sampan, with three Viet Cong aboard, into a narrow canal where the sampan's occupants, aided by eight other Viet Cong along the canal banks, opened fire on the patrol boat. Petty Officer Smith promptly directed his crew in returning suppressive fire which accounted for eight Viet Cong killed. Bringing in his cover boat from the main river, Petty Officer Smith reentered the canal where he came upon a company-size Viet Cong force preparing to board forty sampans. The enemy opened fire on the patrol boats, but were completely repulsed and demoralized by Petty Officer Smith's sudden attack, causing them to retreat in confusion. At least two of the enemy were confirmed as killed. While still returning the heavy fire the Viet Cong were directing at him, Petty Officer Smith systematically destroyed their water transport and equipment. After extracting his patrol to rearm, he reentered the canal for a third time and personally directed his machine gunners in silencing six enemy weapons positions. Petty Officer Smith then vectored a U. S. Navy helicopter in a rocket run on a cleverly camouflaged bunker. A large secondary explosion resulted, completely destroying an enemy ammunition cache. When the overall four-hour engagement had ended, Petty Officer Smith's PBR's had accounted for fifteen enemy confirmed killed, twenty-eight enemy sampans sunk, twelve damaged, three captured, and an enemy ammunition cache destroyed. His daringly aggressive actions, outstanding initiative, extraordinary courage, and gallant leadership were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. SM1 Smith retired at the rank of Captain.

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Chief Petty Officer Truett, 1969- 2004 Inductee
No Image As Patrol Officer of a four boat river patrol in the King Dong Tien Canal in Vietnam taken under fire by North Vietnamese forces, Truett directed his boat into the firing area to rescue men exposed in the water. He provided covering fire and assisted the men from the water; after he had helped rescue the last man from the water, he was mortally wounded. Awarded the Navy Cross.

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MCPON Robert J. Walker 1948-1979 2009 Inductee
The third Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy, the Navy’s highest Enlisted rank. Through his efforts, a petty officer indoctrination course became mandatory for all new E-4s. New chiefs were also required to take indoctrination courses. Leadership management courses gained new emphasis and focus. He initiated the Navy Senior Enlisted Academy, from which virtually all subsequent MCPONs were graduates. He directed the chief's community toward what he described as the five "Principles of Professionalism": technical expertise; Job skill; leadership; motivation; and personal integrity and responsibility. He fought for increases in sea pay, improvements in off duty education opportunities, improvements in enlisted evaluation reports, and a return to the traditional crackerjacks. Through his leadership and dedication the ESWS community has evolved into the professional leaders of our Enlisted community today. Upon retiring from active duty in 1979, his numerous awards attested to his leadership. Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Robert J. Walker- a bold innovator and fearless advocate for Sailors.

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Signalman Second Class Christopher E. Watts 2009 Inductee
He was the ship's signalman, a M-60 Machine Gun Operator, Combat Information Center Watch Officer, and Visit, Board, Search and Seizure (VBSS) Team Member in USS FIREBOLT (PC 10) deployed to the Arabian Gulf in the Spring of 2004. On 24 April 2004, the first day of patrols inside the territorial waters of Iraq following an extended training and repair period, FIREBOLT was tasked with maintaining an established exclusion zone around the Kwahr al Amaya Oil Terminal by querying vessels and approaching as necessary to direct them clear. Upon arrival in their assigned station, over 15 unknown vessels were operating inside the exclusion zone with the majority of vessels appearing to be common fishing dhows. Petty Officer Watts and six other Sailors in the security team boarded the ship's Rigid-Hull Inflatable Boat in the afternoon of 24 April 2004 to clear vessels from the exclusion zone. Within the first hour of operations, the security team successfully cleared over 10 unauthorized vessels from the areas closest to the oil terminal and was beginning to expand the operation into the outer areas of the exclusion zone. An unidentified dhow was detected by the boarding team traveling along a course that would take it in close to the oil terminal and the RHIB was maneuvered to query and intercept. At intercept, the dhow did not answer bridge-to-bridge queries, was unresponsive to loud-hailer directions, and maintained a direct course for the terminal. Some security team members would later report that the helmsman, the only person visible on the vessel, appeared nervous and was gesturing toward the oil terminal. The RHIB circled the dhow to reposition to screen the terminal and get closer for loud-hailer effectiveness. Abruptly, the dhow altered course toward the FIREBOLT RHIB and exploded at close range, violently throwing the security team into the water and overturning the RHIB. Petty Officer Watts had been forward in the RHIB to observe the actions of the dhow and operator and received shrapnel injuries as he was thrown into the water. Soon after the explosion alongside the FIREBOLT RHIB, two other explosives-laden vessels attempted to close the nearby Al Basra Oil Terminal but were disabled by crew-served weapons fire from the alerted security forces on the terminals. Petty Officer Watts was pulled from the water by rescue teams from FIREBOLT and the Australian Frigate Stuart, but died of his wounds less than two hours after the blast. The actions of Petty Officer Christopher Watts and his security team on 24 April 2004 prevented a large scale environmental disaster and a strategic blow to the coalition forces that would have been caused by damage to the oil pipeline or destruction of the offshore oil terminals.

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Warrant Officer Bernard C. Webber, USCG 2010 Inductee
On the night of February 18, 1952, the SS Pendleton, a 503 foot tanker with 33 men on board, broke in two off of Cape Cod. Boatswain Mate First Class Webber, the Coxswain of CG 36500, was called on to rescue the survivors in 60 foot seas and 70 knot winds. The crew faced 60-foot waves, hurricane force winds and blizzard conditions to rescue 32 sailors. When the rescue boat left Chatham Harbor, its compass failed and it began shipping water because the engine kept quitting. But, by dead reckoning, they finally sighted the stern section of the Pendleton where the ship’s crew was awaiting rescue. BM1 Webber courageously positioned CG 36500 beneath the stern of SS Pendelton as it tossed in the heavy seas. He timed the rise and fall of the waves and one by one rescued the men as they climbed down a Jacobs Ladder and jumped into the water. All but one man, the ship’s cook, George D. “Tiny” Myers, was rescued from the SS Pendleton. With no radar or compass to guide them home, Petty Officer Webber relied on expert seamanship and instinct to navigate CG36500 back to its mooring with 32 survivors huddled on board. Received the coveted Coast Guard Gold Medal.

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Boatswain's Mate First Class James Elliott Williams 2000 Inductee
During the Korean War, Petty Officer Williams served aboard USS DOUGLAS H FOX (DD-779) and conducted not only shore bombardment, but also was assigned as a Boat Coxswain to shuttle U.S. and South Korean Raiders from a base off Hungnam, North Korea. During the Vietnam War, he was Boat Captain of PBR-105 operating from 1966-67 out of My Tho, South Vietnam on the Mekong River. He was so successful in interdicting the Viet Cong enemy, he was made a Patrol Officer. He earned the Navy Cross while intercepting an enemy regimental commander's attempt to cross the Mekong River, and, although wounded and under heavy enemy fire from both sides of the river, personally retrieved valuable war plans and documents from the enemy sampan. On 31 October 1966, his patrol intercepted an enemy battalion's attempt to cross the river. In subsequent action that lasted nearly two hours, Petty Officer Williams accounted for over thirty enemy boats sunk or captured, earning the Medal of Honor. Other actions and services resulted in the following additional awards to Petty Officer Williams: Silver Star Medal; two Navy Marine Corps Medals; Legion of Merit with Combat V; two Bronze Star Medals with Combat V; Navy Commendation Medal with Combat V; two Purple Hearts; Vietnamese Cross of Gallantry with Palm.

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Admiral Elmo R. Zumwalt, Jr., 1942-1974 2004 Inductee
Served in destroyers in World War II. Commanded destroyer Dewey and U.S. Naval Forces Vietnam. Served as CNO 1970-74 initiating wide-ranging reforms to modernize Navy personnel policies, improve sailors’ quality of life, and eliminate discrimination. He developed the FFG Class of ships, and decommissioned many WWII ships in order to free funds for modernization and improvement of anti-missile defenses, including long range aircraft detection and interception. Awarded three Distinguished Service Medals and the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

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